Funny Americana

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beachlion
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Funny Americana

Post by beachlion »

All progress takes place outside the comfort zone - M J Bobak
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

Screenshot_20191226-223529_Maps_resize_30_compress40.jpg
Sounds like a nice Saturday trip!
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beachlion
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by beachlion »

I had you in mind when I posted it. ;)
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r.m.anderson
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by r.m.anderson »

Google Map Image (Satellite) LINK:

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.5566781 ... a=!3m1!1e3


Vulcan in middle of pix

Map is zoomable

Interesting -

Take me home to country roads - but there are none only Railroad Tracks
"Kilt-On" -or- as the case may be "Skirt-On" !
WHY ?
Isn't wearing a kilt enough?
Well a skirt will do in a pinch!
Make mine short and don't you dare think of pinching there !
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by PatJ »

Is it just me, or does that landscape look like it has a bunch of nasty looking scars
from strip mining?

Not only in West Virginia, but Kentucky as well.
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Re: Funny Americana

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PatJ wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:01 pm
Is it just me, or does that landscape look like it has a bunch of nasty looking scars from strip mining?
Yes. That's the very heart of Coal Country. The extent of the scarring is definitely evident, as are the various strip mines that have been "reclaimed" (insofar as that's possible).
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

We weren't far from Vulcan just last year (2018) as a matter of fact, having a ride through southern West Virginia/Northern Kentucky, we stopped in the town of Matewan West Virginia. The area looked to be very "red neck", however upon stopping to use the rest room and take a few photos, I found the only reaction I got was some mild laughter and finger pointing from a distance.... Nothing extreme.... I didn't get run off with a shot gun or anything as some might have expected.
matewan.jpg
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

crfriend wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:33 pm
PatJ wrote:
Fri Dec 27, 2019 6:01 pm
Is it just me, or does that landscape look like it has a bunch of nasty looking scars from strip mining?
Yes. That's the very heart of Coal Country. The extent of the scarring is definitely evident, as are the various strip mines that have been "reclaimed" (insofar as that's possible).
Alas, many outsiders are a bit uneasy about trekking deep in the heart of coal country, other still are almost amazed that a guy like me can even exist in these parts and not wind up dead. The key to surviving as an eccentric "crossdresser" in coal county is as follows:

As long as you don't run down coal, God (Yahweh), or guns... you'll be okay.
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by denimini »

Great story and interesting geographical area. A good strategy for getting attention; they probably had no qualms about contacting the Kremlin as most mining towns were very left wing.
moonshadow wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 4:56 pm
Alas, many outsiders are a bit uneasy about trekking deep in the heart of coal country, other still are almost amazed that a guy like me can even exist in these parts and not wind up dead. The key to surviving as an eccentric "crossdresser" in coal county is as follows:

As long as you don't run down coal, God (Yahweh), or guns... you'll be okay.
Thankfully it is different here, as I am surrounded by mining towns, and certainly not infested with guns and bibles. My nearest big town for supplies, 200 kms west is Broken Hill (pop 17,000), a silver, lead and zinc mining town which featured in the film "Priscilla queen of the desert" and now hosts an annual "Broken Heel" crossdressing festival. I am always treated with courtesy, respect and "normalcy" when trading there wearing a mini skirt and never mistaken as a crossdresser. Broken Hill is the birthplace of BHP and considered so of Australian unions. 265 kms east is a copper mining town (pop 4,000) and 100 kms north is a opal mining town (pop 103). No coal mines nearby but I imagine they would be friendly too, as long as one carried a lump of coal with them, as our PM does.

Not as green around here as Vulcan, making it difficult to see any scars although lot of the mines are underground and not open cut.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Broke ... 41.4539396
Anthony, a denim miniskirt wearer in Outback Australia
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Re: Funny Americana

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denimini wrote:
Sun Dec 29, 2019 12:47 am
Great story and interesting geographical area. A good strategy for getting attention; they probably had no qualms about contacting the Kremlin as most mining towns were very left wing.
Interestingly, here that's not really the case. What happened in that particular instance is that the community could not convince county, state, nor Federal government of their plight and decided to appeal elsewhere. That at least got the attention of the local politicos because the fallout from "foreign aid" into the USA would have been a propaganda windfall for the Soviets. Most of Appalachia, as far as I can tell has been "right" (to use the old term) leaning.
Thankfully it is different here, as I am surrounded by mining towns, and certainly not infested with guns and bibles. My nearest big town for supplies, 200 kms west is Broken Hill (pop 17,000), a silver, lead and zinc mining town which featured in the film "Priscilla queen of the desert" and now hosts an annual "Broken Heel" crossdressing festival. I am always treated with courtesy, respect and "normalcy" when trading there wearing a mini skirt and never mistaken as a crossdresser. Broken Hill is the birthplace of BHP and considered so of Australian unions. 265 kms east is a copper mining town (pop 4,000) and 100 kms north is a opal mining town (pop 103). No coal mines nearby but I imagine they would be friendly too, as long as one carried a lump of coal with them, as our PM does.
What a different landscape than we have in the USA. I'd say you guys in Oz win the prize for most habitable, or at least most civil.

200 klicks east of Broken Hill? Dang, you are livin' in the outback!
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by dillon »

http://www.kentuckyexplorer.com/nonmemb ... story.html
Interesting spot in NE KY. Especially the construction of the tunnel. I am convinced that the habitability of eastern KY is fully owed to the invention of dynamite. Men died building this tunnel; one from attempting to thaw frozen dynamite by setting it next to a fire. The first log train to exit the gorge got lodged in the tunnel and also had to be blasted free.
As a matter of fact, the sun DOES shine out of my ...
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

Well... today was the day, and what an interesting trip!

On the google map, it seems so close (by the way the crow flies), and yet, upon planning my route, I found there was no direct road seeming to lead to Vulcan WV. The route would ultimately be a series of turns snaking around several mountain passes. I decided not to use the GPS navigator and rather rely on my cached google map instead.

I missed several turns. It took over two hours to arrive.

When we arrived at Vulcan WV I realized that I had indeed been by this road at some point in the past. The scenery became familiar. Indeed, it was KY route 194 that I took on my way home from Matewan from when the photo above was taken. I drove right past Vulcan and didn't even realize it.

Upon revisiting Vulcan I can understand why.... Vulcan WV has a bridge....

...that's it. A bridge. And not even a particularly spectacular bridge at that, just an ordinary single lane crossing. There was no street marker on the bridge so I nearly drove right past it a second time.

Image
The bridge leading into Vulcan West Virginia (we were on the Kentucky side on route 194)

As I arrived on the other side of the bridge, I questioned whether I was supposed to be here. The road looked very rough and seemed like it may have been a private drive. I circled around a few times and debated on proceeding. I referenced my google map once more and double checked-- yes, the road runs directly along the rail road.

Image
Vulcan West Virginia

As I proceeded I drove past a few ramshackle houses. A few people were sitting on their porches and watched me drive by, literally along side of the rail road tracks. I continued to wonder if I were trespassing somehow, as in my experience these roads are normally reserved for rail road vehicles. Nevertheless, google has it as a "road" so I pressed on, holding second gear through the pot holes, glancing down at my long ankle length tie die skirt, wondering how I'd explain myself should I receive a friendly visit from the local sheriff. I didn't notice any "NO TRESPASSING" signs, or any indication that I were on a private road, so in the event of confrontation, that would be my defense. Thankfully, nobody bothered us.

Image

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We drove past a few houses then there was nothing but the creek to the left, the tracks to the right, and a pot hole covered, single lane, gravel road leading God knows where. I said to myself on more than one occasional "what has Beachlion gotten me into??"

On up the road a piece, we had to cross the tracks (gravel was piled up against the rails making this possible) and continued down towards an opening that led back to the state maintained road. My final words were "lets get the hell out of here..."

All this said however, it was somewhat neat to travel what appeared to be the same road the residents of yesteryear had to travel to get to civilization. That crossing that I crossed must have been the crossing the article mentioned that children had to crawl underneath parked rail cars to get to school.

I didn't get out to walk around (other than to pull off in a grassy area to answer the call of nature). So nobody saw me in my attire, however, just about 15 minutes back down KY194 I stopped at a gas station to top off and grab some beverages. Nobody bothered me, but I think I freaked an older guy out. He gave me quite a terrified look as he ran his eyes up and down my outfit and tried to assess what he is witnessing on this warm January day... the end of the world perhaps? Who knows...

We also stopped at a Subway for a late lunch in Grundy Virginia, and at a Dollar General in Honaker, Once again, I had no problems. All this said I'm not sure I'd want to be just walking along the side of the road in those parts, and I took comfort knowing I had my emergency "normal clothes" in the back of my vehicle. These seem like rough parts. The little gas stations and towns along the map are okay to stop, but I'm not sure I'd want to be caught alone, in a skirt, in the spaces in between.

Below are some photos of the ride to and fro...

Oh the sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home.... (click and let the music carry you away!)

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Last edited by moonshadow on Sun Jan 12, 2020 2:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
moonshadow
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

The drive...

Image
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Re: Funny Americana

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moonshadow wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:17 am
Well... today was the day, and what an interesting trip!

On the google map, it seems so close (by the way the crow flies), and yet, upon planning my route, I found there was no direct road seeming to lead to Vulcan WV. The route would ultimately be a series of turns snaking around several mountain passes. I decided not to use the GPS navigator and rather rely on my cached google map instead.
You, Sir, have been where few have save for locals.

It looks like CSX has somewhat "opened up" their access road that parallels the rail line but may not be happy about it. These are the situations where it's appropriate to "expect a train at any time, and with no warning".

Thank you very much for the photography. Each image, as they say, conveying a thousand words.
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Re: Funny Americana

Post by moonshadow »

"Do one brave thing today, then run like hell!"

Mission accomplished! :lol:
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