Getting photographed in public

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DrFishnets
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Getting photographed in public

Post by DrFishnets »

I had a walk into town today as I do every day. Anyway something happened that made me upset. I was walking downs steps into a walkway that’s under a building and while walking down the steps I seen a woman in the walkway pointing an DSLR camera at my direction as if she was taking a photo of me walking down the steps.

Anyway I felt a bit upset and angry and felt like asking her if I was in the photo but I didn’t want to cause bother and continued to walk on. So far I’ve spent the day stressed out about it and upset. Similar things like that have happened before and I find it annoying. I think they call it street photography. Don’t get me wrong I’m into photography myself but I don’t like getting my photo taking or being in a photo someone in public is taking. What are fellow members feeling of this?
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Seb
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by Seb »

I think this is just a side effect of moving around an urban area. I used to do a bit of urban photography when I was in high school. If the photographer has any decency they will make sure to have an angle where everyone in the photo is either too far away or otherwise obscured so they cannot be identified. Especially if they are sharing/using/selling the photos anywhere they will want to have permission from any identifiable subjects. I'd guess most most them will be happy to show you the picture if you ask, and remove it if you are not happy to be in it.

At least with a DSLR you know where they are pointing and that they are probably taking pictures or setting up a shot, mobile cameras are a lot more sneaky and their users usually don't care about the subjects integrity.

Unfortunately I would say that if you move in public spaces(be it the city or your street) there is always a risk that you might get caught on someone's photos. I wish everyone had the decency to ask for permission, but that is not the world we live in.
Especially considering almost everyone is now walking around with a high-res capable camera in their phones, that is very easy to take pictures fast with and without anyone noticing, and think of all the likes on social media... and the film and developing only costs time...
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Mouse
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by Mouse »

I have been asked by two photographers on London streets to take my picture. Both times I have said yes and one picture of me, is on their Instagram, however not showing the skirt I was wearing.
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DrFishnets
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by DrFishnets »

Seb wrote: Sat Jul 06, 2024 4:53 pm Unfortunately I would say that if you move in public spaces(be it the city or your street) there is always a risk that you might get caught on someone's photos. I wish everyone had the decency to ask for permission, but that is not the world we live in.
Especially considering almost everyone is now walking around with a high-res capable camera in their phones, that is very easy to take pictures fast with and without anyone noticing, and think of all the likes on social media... and the film and developing only costs time...
Yeah since the advent of smart phones with cameras it’s becoming impossible not to be in someone’s photo when out in any public area.

I am kind of glad when the woman took the photograph when I was running down the steps at the walkway that I had my long trench coat buttoned up so my dress wasn’t exposed. Only my timberland boots, my tights clad ankles and my long trench coat (which is very long and goes down to my ankles) were exposed. It wouldn’t put it past some people if my dress was showing they would have posted it on social media ridiculing me as a guy wearing a dress.
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phathack
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by phathack »

In a polite world you would be asked before you photo is taken however in the modern world thats not always possible.

Street Photography - A Style of photography that captures people living their everyday lives. Its been around since the introduction of hand held cameras.

The whole concept of street photography is to capture people on the street doing what ever they were doing not posing for the camera. As a result you can't ask the person if you can take their photo because they would then pose for a photo and thats a portrait or selfie.

Street photo can be published, many a book on the subject has been published as well as the photos used in news stories, today add Social Media as another place a street photo can appear without your permission.

These photos cannot be used to sell a product, published to a site with questionable moral values or taken in a private location.
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denimini
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by denimini »

These days if you are out in public then you are possibly out there on a world stage thanks to mobile phones and social media. Generally we don't go out in attire that we are ashamed of which is a just as well with the possibility of photos of us being published without our permission.
I have had a few people ask if they can take a photo, usually in the context of my renovation work but no doubt with the mini skirt in frame, which I am OK with.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by Faldaguy »

DrFishnets wrote: Sat Jul 06, 2024 7:06 pm
Seb wrote: Sat Jul 06, 2024 4:53 pm Unfortunately I would say that if you move in public spaces(be it the city or your street) there is always a risk that you might get caught on someone's photos. I wish everyone had the decency to ask for permission, but that is not the world we live in.
Especially considering almost everyone is now walking around with a high-res capable camera in their phones, that is very easy to take pictures fast with and without anyone noticing, and think of all the likes on social media... and the film and developing only costs time...
Yeah since the advent of smart phones with cameras it’s becoming impossible not to be in someone’s photo when out in any public area.

I am kind of glad when the woman took the photograph when I was running down the steps at the walkway that I had my long trench coat buttoned up so my dress wasn’t exposed. Only my timberland boots, my tights clad ankles and my long trench coat (which is very long and goes down to my ankles) were exposed. It wouldn’t put it past some people if my dress was showing they would have posted it on social media ridiculing me as a guy wearing a dress.
I get the strong sense you are not yet comfortable or confident in your choice of clothing; being cloaked in trench coat, suggests you may want to engage more gingerly with attire that you feel good in and can gather a genuine sense of confidence -- baby steps so to speak. (For some jumping right in works, others it is a longer haul.)

As for cameras -- as pointed out, they are everywhere and no doubt many of us are in photos, intentional and inadvertently; and certainly in some places security cameras are recording our every move -- so outside of your own home, IF, it is without ANY cameras -- including your own laptop and phone, you should expect -- like it or not -- to be "on candid camera". Being a MIS is obviously going to catch a few eyes and lenses. Show your pride, not your fear.

As for Social media -- this site is about as 'social' as I get online so I can't comment on any propensity to mock others -- but I can say in the scanning I have done, I've have observed lots of support for style and fashion including MIS; and nary a comment about "weirdos" though some don't like the particular style. You need to conquer your fear -- not just being out there or flaunting, but being out there with calm and confidence.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by DrFishnets »

Faldaguy wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 4:29 am I get the strong sense you are not yet comfortable or confident in your choice of clothing; being cloaked in trench coat, suggests you may want to engage more gingerly with attire that you feel good in and can gather a genuine sense of confidence -- baby steps so to speak. (For some jumping right in works, others it is a longer haul.)

As for cameras -- as pointed out, they are everywhere and no doubt many of us are in photos, intentional and inadvertently; and certainly in some places security cameras are recording our every move -- so outside of your own home, IF, it is without ANY cameras -- including your own laptop and phone, you should expect -- like it or not -- to be "on candid camera". Being a MIS is obviously going to catch a few eyes and lenses. Show your pride, not your fear.
I have been out in public a couple of times wearing just a skirt or dress and I mentioned it on this forum to much praise from members. However, you are right that I am still not fully confident hence the reason I wear a trench coat over my outfit most of the time I go out in public though I was out in public a couple of weeks ago wearing my kilt with a black tshirt and burgundy waistcoat and nobody batted an eyelid and I felt great.

I guess you are right that cameras are everywhere be it people with DSLR cameras, smart phones and Go Pros to streets and shops with CCTV. For some reason I am kind of okay with CCTVs as images and videos from CCTVs are deleted after a period of time and they aren’t posted online. What upsets me is being on photos and videos that any Tom, Dick and Harriet in the general public has taken when out in public as they are there forever and quite often posted online for all to see. That’s what freaks me out.

However, I guess I am going to have to accept this and stop fretting whenever a camera is pointing at me when out in town. I guess if I don’t like this then I’m better staying at home as a hermit but I don’t want that to happen as staying at home all the time affects my anxiety and depression.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by Midas »

Being photographed or filmed is an unfortunate reality of modern life, given the proliferation of smartphones and the various forms of video surveillance (cctv, dashcams etc).

If you are worried about this it is difficult to go out at all. The only option is to get on with life as you wish, wearing what you want and to hell with it.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by victor1964 »

A quick internet search brough this up (expertphotography.com)

"Photography Laws UK: Your Rights

If you’re on public property, you can take photos of whatever you like. Whether it’s property or people, you don’t need anyone’s permission. Some people are going to tell you that you can’t take photos of private property, such as bank buildings and people’s houses. So long as you are on public property, you can.

This means that you can take photos in public libraries, museums, government buildings, from the street and anywhere else that’s public. The only case where you can’t take pictures is if there’s a specific law that prevents such shooting.

You’re also allowed to take photos in private property that is open to public, such as shopping centres, malls, pubs, restaurants, etc. You will, however, have to stop if the owner/management ask you to. Sounds fair enough to me.

You don’t need a person’s consent to take their photo if they are in a public place. They do, however, have a reasonable right to privacy. So, you can’t be intrusive if they’re in a private place like their own home. This means that, if they’re walking down the street, you can take their photo. But you can’t peer through their living room window and start snapping...."
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Re: Getting photographed in public

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DrFishnets wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 8:57 am I have been out in public a couple of times wearing just a skirt or dress and I mentioned it on this forum to much praise from members. However, you are right that I am still not fully confident hence the reason I wear a trench coat over my outfit most of the time I go out in public though I was out in public a couple of weeks ago wearing my kilt with a black tshirt and burgundy waistcoat and nobody batted an eyelid and I felt great.

I guess you are right that cameras are everywhere be it people with DSLR cameras, smart phones and Go Pros to streets and shops with CCTV. For some reason I am kind of okay with CCTVs as images and videos from CCTVs are deleted after a period of time and they aren’t posted online. What upsets me is being on photos and videos that any Tom, Dick and Harriet in the general public has taken when out in public as they are there forever and quite often posted online for all to see. That’s what freaks me out.

However, I guess I am going to have to accept this and stop fretting whenever a camera is pointing at me when out in town. I guess if I don’t like this then I’m better staying at home as a hermit but I don’t want that to happen as staying at home all the time affects my anxiety and depression.
Maybe a fun counterpoint to this is to take your own pictures of yourself, out in public. I use my phone and cheap BlueTooth remote, just prop the phone on the floor against a building, stand back, click, picture. You don't have to show anybody the results, but it gives you something to remember you outings by and shows your progress as you get more confidence in your skirt wearing.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

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Mouse wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 12:30 pmMaybe a fun counterpoint to this is to take your own pictures of yourself, out in public. I use my phone and cheap BlueTooth remote, just prop the phone on the floor against a building, stand back, click, picture. You don't have to show anybody the results, but it gives you something to remember you outings by and shows your progress as you get more confidence in your skirt wearing.
This also helps in coordinating outfits. You can see what works and doesn't work
on your body frame. A helpful tool to use for personal educational purposes :D

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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by crfriend »

Uncle Al wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 1:16 pmThis also helps in coordinating outfits. You can see what works and doesn't work
on your body frame. A helpful tool to use for personal educational purposes :D
I can attest to this as well -- a photograph is vastly more informative than an image in a mirror. I've said it in the past, "Mirrors lie like rugs. They tell you what you want to see, not what it really there. A photograph, however, represents the way the world sees you not the way you see yourself."

As far as getting photographed in public goes, it's impossible to avoid in surveillance societies like the USA, so just accept that it's going to happen and don't worry about it. Professional photographers tend to ask permission if they want to take a shot of you, but generally speaking, and as a matter of practicality, professionals are almost as thin on the ground as men in skirts so anything goes.

interestingly, architectural photography can get one in trouble in public if some over-officious plod decides to hassle you over the Cheney-era "Patriot Act" rules which are still in force 23 years after "9/11". I took some grief over that a few times and finally said, "Screw this" and put the cameras away.
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DrFishnets
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by DrFishnets »

Mouse wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 12:30 pm Maybe a fun counterpoint to this is to take your own pictures of yourself, out in public. I use my phone and cheap BlueTooth remote, just prop the phone on the floor against a building, stand back, click, picture. You don't have to show anybody the results, but it gives you something to remember you outings by and shows your progress as you get more confidence in your skirt wearing.
You know what that’s a good idea. I was thinking of selfies with landmarks behind and I could also take a selfie in the mirrors of a department clothes shop too when nobody is looking. In fact I have been taking selfies at home of me in my skirts, dresses and kilt.

I will eventually post images of me in my outfits once I’ve lost a bit of weight and once I feel okay about sharing photos online. I just have to give up the Bacardi and coca-cola as I’m in the keto diet.
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Re: Getting photographed in public

Post by DrFishnets »

crfriend wrote: Sun Jul 07, 2024 2:22 pm interestingly, architectural photography can get one in trouble in public if some over-officious plod decides to hassle you over the Cheney-era "Patriot Act" rules which are still in force 23 years after "9/11". I took some grief over that a few times and finally said, "Screw this" and put the cameras away.
I have a big interest in architecture and I remember going to London for a holiday back in 2012. My hotel was based at Canary Wharf and I remember taking photos of the buildings when suddenly an angry security guard came towards me and told me to remove the photos from my camera which I had to do.
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