Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

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familyman34
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by familyman34 »

geron wrote: Thu Jul 20, 2023 10:55 am
rode_kater wrote: Thu Jul 20, 2023 7:48 am Bletchley Park was cool and it's nice to see all the stuff in context, but the NMoC next-door (which it didn't realise existed until I saw the sign) blew my mind. If you have any interest in the history of computers it's absolutely worth a visit.
To fly off on yet another tangent, another museum in England that you might enjoy is the global telecoms museum in Porthcurno, Cornwall,
https://pkporthcurno.com/
This occupies the site where the first international telegraph cable -- to India -- was brought ashore in 1870, predating both the telephone and radio communications. By the outbreak of war in 1939 it was the terminus for 14 undersea cables -- and today there are also six optical fibre cables for digital communications. A few weeks ago I visited the museum (skirted, of course, so you have a precedent) with my wife, and we both found it absolutely riveting.
I think that you are mistaken on the subject of the "first international telegraph cable" since cables had already been laid between counties in Europe, e.g. France and the UK, Belgium and the UK, and various Scandinavian countries.

The first intercontinental cable (that carried messages successfully) was that laid across the Atlantic in 1857, from Newfoundland (then a self-governing British colony, now part of Canada) to Valentia (then part of the United Kingdom, now in the Republic of Ireland). However this cable did not last for long. See https://atlantic-cable.com/Cableships/GreatEastern/

A second but unsuccessful attempt was made in 1865. See https://atlantic-cable.com/Article/Gooch/index.html

The first transatlantic cable that proved durable, and carried regular communications was laid in 1866 (and the previous failed cable of 1865 was also recovered, repaired and put back into service). See https://atlantic-cable.com/CableCos/Ang ... /index.htm

The whole subject of these cables is fascinating, and the technological spin-offs are still of the greatest importance. A researcher who has devoted himself to the whole subject is Dr Donard de Cogan, and it's worth searching for his papers on the net and in print.
Familyman34
pelmut
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by pelmut »

If you are in Cornwall, don't miss the Cornwall at War Museum.  It is an amazing collection presented in an endearingly amateurish way; it looks as though everyone in Cornwall has turned out their garden sheds to contribute to it.
There is no such thing as a normal person, only someone you don't know very well yet.
geron
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by geron »

familyman34 wrote: Thu Jul 20, 2023 12:31 pm I think that you are mistaken on the subject of the "first international telegraph cable" since cables had already been laid between counties in Europe, e.g. France and the UK, Belgium and the UK, and various Scandinavian countries.
I'm sure you're right, fm34 -- that date did seem very late. Perhaps it was the start of the network linking up the British Empire. But do visit the museum if you're ever down that way -- it's fascinating. And Porthcurno has some superb beaches too :-)
Midas
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by Midas »

Milton Keynes was a contrived name based on two prominent economists, Milton Friedman and John Maynard Keynes.
geron
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by geron »

Midas wrote: Sat Jul 22, 2023 11:22 am Milton Keynes was a contrived name based on two prominent economists, Milton Friedman and John Maynard Keynes.
Ingenious but anachronistic! Wikipedia tells us that Milton (a fairly common village name in England) is a contraction of the mediaeval Middeltone, and Keynes comes from the de Cahaignes family, who took ownership of the manor after the Norman conquest of 1066.

But while Maynard Keynes and his family have retained the French pronunciation, rhyming more or less with Canes, the conurbation has undergone one of our vowel shifts and is pronounced "Milton Keens".
FranTastic444
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by FranTastic444 »

Not sure if this is an urban myth, but I'm told that in the same way that (some) locals of Bristol refer to the location as Brizzle, some inhabitants of Milton Keynes have been known to call their hometown Milk 'n Beans :-)
geron
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by geron »

FranTastic444 wrote: Sat Jul 22, 2023 1:50 pm Not sure if this is an urban myth, but I'm told that in the same way that (some) locals of Bristol refer to the location as Brizzle....
I was once told (admittedly, by someone from the opposite end of the country) that Bristol is really Bristow, but the local accent tends to add an L to a final vowel.
https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bris ... ry-3532222
pelmut
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by pelmut »

geron wrote: Sat Jul 22, 2023 6:12 pm
FranTastic444 wrote: Sat Jul 22, 2023 1:50 pm Not sure if this is an urban myth, but I'm told that in the same way that (some) locals of Bristol refer to the location as Brizzle....
I was once told (admittedly, by someone from the opposite end of the country) that Bristol is really Bristow, but the local accent tends to add an L to a final vowel.
https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bris ... ry-3532222
I've seen it spelled "Brightstowe" on an old map.  I can confirm that we pronounce it "Brizzle" and the accent adds an 'L' to many words that end in a vowel: "aireal" [area], "ideal" [idea], "Asdawl" [Asda, the supermarket].  The language also includes a curious throwback to 'thee' and 'thou':

Thee's got'n whur thee castn't back'n, hasn't?
Thee's got'n in a right ol mess somehow.
Thee's never oughta stuck'n in thur, diss'n?
So what be gwain do about it now?

Thee's catch a packet if thee cas'n shift'n.
For a copper's bound to come up from somewhur.
Oh ah! Thee's bin an gone an got'n whur thee cas'n back'n hasn't?
How bist gonna get'n outa thur?
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skirtyscot
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by skirtyscot »

Ampus991 wrote: Wed Jul 19, 2023 2:24 am denimini wrote:
> Welcome to the Cafe.
> I would be interested to know your other stringent requirements for skirts,
> the stretch test is a good one.

Well, solid muted or dusky colours; length 45 to 60 cm, so nothing too short or below the knee; material black denim in preference to ubiquitous blue, plain cotton, (especially) needle cord; at least 2 pockets and if 4 then the back ones should be deep enough to contain nearly all of my phone and wallet; and preferably belt loops and a front zipper. I probably get 60:40 from charity shops (love serendipity) and online reductions.
Welcome, Ampus991! I'm sure you'll find plenty to contribute to here if you try. You could start by telling us more. Do you wear your skirts often? What reactions do you get, from strangers, from friends, and from family?

Your self-imposed restrictions are indeed stringent. Do you find many skirts which fit the bill? Are you completely happy with this style, or are you deliberately limiting yourself for some reason?

The first skirt I bought was a knee-length blue denim one, but I soon started to try a wider variety of styles. I'd encourage you to do the same, it's fun and all you need is a bit of courage at first.

Whether you stick with your current style or not, keep flying the flag for skirted men!
Keep on skirting,

Alastair
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Myopic Bookworm
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Re: Hello from Milton Keynes, UK

Post by Myopic Bookworm »

pelmut wrote: Sat Jul 22, 2023 9:42 pm The language also includes a curious throwback to 'thee' and 'thou':
Not really a throwback: quite a number of English dialects never lost it, both in the southwest and in the north.
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