Photography

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Elisabetta
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Photography

Post by Elisabetta »

Hi everyone! I figured I'd make a thread that talks about different photography and can hopefully get feedback on a few of mine.

Here are four photos I've taken. If you were a buyer would you buy these and how much would you spend? I'm wanting to become a photographer and get a really good camera to take good quality pictures. I've also been wanting to look into getting flickr pro but making sure it'd be worth it before I do.

These pictures were taken on my Samsung Galaxy A53.

Which style camera do you think I should look into?

You can also see the rest of what I've taken pictures of by checking out my Flickr @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/199564555@N05/
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Re: Photography

Post by moonshadow »

The bridge looks pretty cool.
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Elisabetta
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Re: Photography

Post by Elisabetta »

moonshadow wrote: Sun Dec 03, 2023 11:48 pm The bridge looks pretty cool.
Thank you ❤️ Any feedback for me regarding my questions above?
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Re: Photography

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The bridge is familiar to me from Moon's photo of it, but yours is a much more dramatic angle with quite a bit of geologic interest to it. The fourth one is also very nice with very pretty light, shadow, and colour.

Much of what a photographer does is based on when to release the shutter; most of the rest comprises composition and lighting. Sometimes those are under one's control, and sometimes they're not -- and that's where plain dumb luck comes into play and much depends on how fast one can get the camera into action "in the heat of the moment". Two of my best were accidental shots simply because I happened to have my camera with me on one field-service job in downtown Boston as the sun was going down and I managed to catch the Old South Church silhouetted against the red/orange sunset. (Astonishingly, those two slides survived into present time and have been scanned, but the scans just don't really do them justice.)

Concentrate first on composition, then on light. Instinct should tell you when to release the shutter. The less one has to do in the lab the better the overall result will be -- and sometimes this takes real patience!
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Re: Photography

Post by Elisabetta »

crfriend wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:06 am The bridge is familiar to me from Moon's photo of it, but yours is a much more dramatic angle with quite a bit of geologic interest to it. The fourth one is also very nice with very pretty light, shadow, and colour.

Much of what a photographer does is based on when to release the shutter; most of the rest comprises composition and lighting. Sometimes those are under one's control, and sometimes they're not -- and that's where plain dumb luck comes into play and much depends on how fast one can get the camera into action "in the heat of the moment". Two of my best were accidental shots simply because I happened to have my camera with me on one field-service job in downtown Boston as the sun was going down and I managed to catch the Old South Church silhouetted against the red/orange sunset. (Astonishingly, those two slides survived into present time and have been scanned, but the scans just don't really do them justice.)

Concentrate first on composition, then on light. Instinct should tell you when to release the shutter. The less one has to do in the lab the better the overall result will be -- and sometimes this takes real patience!
Thanks Carl appreciate the feedback.
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Re: Photography

Post by Bill »

I like the first and third the best (I am into photographing bridges).

I've tried Flickr and SmugMug but for successful sales I've been using FineArtAmerica for the almost ten years. I originally signed up on December 26, 2013. You can get started there for free (but a full blown premium membership is only $30 per year. That provides your own private gallery website and an offering of many sizes/styles of prints and a variety of home decor and other items. They handle the sale, the production and the shipping - and send you your markup (profit) on a regular basis.

Here is one I sold just this afternoon: https://bill.pixels.com/saleannouncemen ... 3f354e23b7
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Re: Photography

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Elisabetta wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:08 amThanks Carl appreciate the feedback.
You're most welcome. Photography is a fascinating endeavour, and sometimes I'm sorry to have gotten away from it.

For reference, your shot of the bridge across the Columbia River in Washington is a much more artistic angle than the one Moon posted -- and which got my attention. In this, I think Moon was primarily concentrating on the driving -- good for him! -- and you were after "something more". It's a compelling sight, and one which could be shot any number of ways. Moon's is more "documentary" in style where yours is more "artistic". That was down to "when to release the shutter".

I'll try to dig out some of my scans.
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Re: Photography

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Bill wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:10 am I like the first and third the best (I am into photographing bridges).

I've tried Flickr and SmugMug but for successful sales I've been using FineArtAmerica for the almost ten years. I originally signed up on December 26, 2013. You can get started there for free (but a full blown premium membership is only $30 per year. That provides your own private gallery website and an offering of many sizes/styles of prints and a variety of home decor and other items. They handle the sale, the production and the shipping - and send you your markup (profit) on a regular basis.

Here is one I sold just this afternoon: https://bill.pixels.com/saleannouncemen ... 3f354e23b7

Thank you! That picture of yours is beautiful!
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Re: Photography

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I'm glad you're enjoying taking photos Liz. For me, I find it to be a relatively easy and affordable hobby to get into. Also, unlike many popular hobbies, photography is one of those that gets you out of the house frequently in search of cool places to shoot photos.

I've used Flickr off and on now for years. Photography is not something I do for money or praise. Rather I view my collection of photos as a time capsule of my life. 99% of my photos are not exactly "award winning", they are just shots of my life and the things I see in my day to day experiences.

The say a picture is worth a thousand words, and few things can stir feelings of nostalgia and resurrecting old, once forgotten memories like stumbling on an old photo. When I was growing up, I used to enjoy sitting at the coffee table in the living room flipping the pages of my family's old photo albums. I not only enjoy the main characters of the individual photos, but I also enjoy the backdrop too. It is quite literally like looking back in time...

And every once in a while, you just happen upon a photo that sends chills up your spine...

ImageA day in West Virginia, Autumn 2011 by Andrea Palumbo, on Flickr

Take this one for example... It was taken with a cheap old $30 Fijufilm digital camera, long before we had our own smart phones or a Nikon. It was taken not for reasons of photography, but rather to capture a snapshot in our life in 2011. It was never meant to win awards, to make money, or win acclaim, rather it's sole purpose was to remember, and to tell a story.

Now I know the exact backstory of this photo, and Liz, you should too, but others here do not, and that's the magic of it... what does the casual observer see? So much is left to the imagination!
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Re: Photography

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Elisabetta wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 12:24 am
Thank you! That picture of yours is beautiful!
Thank you so much. I have nearly 1500 in my online galleries. I've been shooting for 60 years (literally) and use photography as part of what keeps me going in my retirement years.

You seem to be developing and "eye" for the craft. Composition and lighting are far more important than is the exact equipment one uses. Keep at it - you will do well.
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Re: Photography

Post by timemeddler »

probably about six maybe seven years ago I bought a nikon d5300, haven't seen any reason to get anything more than that yet, not counting an extra lens or two.
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Re: Photography

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Here's a couple of my gems, shot from the 5th floor of Boston's Hancock Tower with a Nikon F3 in the mid 1980s on Kodachrome.
OSC-at-sunset-SC.jpg
The view of the main tower.
OSC-at-sunset2-SC.jpg
The second one is marred by a distinctly 20th Century object, else the shot is entirely and completely timeless!

Camera: Nikon F3, 70-210 mm f4 zoom lens, ASA 25 Kodachrome transparency film, long exposure, likely shot with the camera sitting on a desk or table.
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Elisabetta
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Re: Photography

Post by Elisabetta »

crfriend wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 3:38 pm Here's a couple of my gems, shot from the 5th floor of Boston's Hancock Tower with a Nikon F3 in the mid 1980s on Kodachrome.
OSC-at-sunset-SC.jpg
The view of the main tower.

OSC-at-sunset2-SC.jpg
The second one is marred by a distinctly 20th Century object, else the shot is entirely and completely timeless!

Camera: Nikon F3, 70-210 mm f4 zoom lens, ASA 25 Kodachrome transparency film, long exposure, likely shot with the camera sitting on a desk or table.
Very nice shots.
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Re: Photography

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Elisabetta wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 6:27 pmVery nice shots.
Grazie! The bulk of my work was landscape/nature and architectural photography (twin passions) with a fair amount of documentary work as well in the computer-history field.

I lost a large core of my work in a basement flood in 2008, and when film went obsolete kind of gave up. I do have a small digi-cam now that I use for things when I'm trying to be serious, but that's getting somewhat rare and the thing doesn't travel with me the way my main camera did "way back when". I miss the simple elegance of mechanical cameras where one never had to interact with a "menu" to do something -- there was always a control for it on the camera that simply "fell to hand". Nowadays, to deliberately "overexpose" (the way one has to do with white winter landscapes) it takes five minutes to figure the "menu" out, and by that time the light has usually gone. On a mechanical, there's a knob on the top of the camera body. (And I do have my grandfathers fully mechanical (as in clockwork) Nikkormat!)

I've done some portraiture, but not a whole lot, and then only of close friends.
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Re: Photography

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moonshadow wrote: Mon Dec 04, 2023 1:07 am Take this one for example... It was taken with a cheap old $30 Fijufilm digital camera, long before we had our own smart phones or a Nikon. It was taken not for reasons of photography, but rather to capture a snapshot in our life in 2011. It was never meant to win awards, to make money, or win acclaim, rather it's sole purpose was to remember, and to tell a story.
This is an important part of photography, actually pressing the button at a given point of time regardless of equipment, technical or artisic ability.
It becomes a historic record.
The question is whether digital images will survive the test of time as well as photochemical images have. I have photos of my house and Bond Store taken in the 1880's, taken by professional photographers of the day, which I am most interested in and thankful for.
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