Sari's

Discussion of fashion elements and looks that are traditionally considered somewhat "femme" but are presented in a masculine context. This is NOT about transvestism or crossdressing.
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Big and Bashful
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Sari's

Post by Big and Bashful »

As someone who loves loose clothing (hence skirts) I have often looked at women wearing traditional sari's and thought, a) they look fantastic, so elegant, b) they look ever so comfortable and c) why only for women?

I wonder if I am alone thinking this? I think a sari would be a good substitute for a dress on a male, wrapped slightly different because a bare beer gut isn't a wonderful concept!
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STEVIE
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Re: Sari's

Post by STEVIE »

Hi B&B
Man, I reckon that's quite a good idea actually. On the practical side you would have to find someone to perfect the wrap.
Otherwise, disaster?
Good thinking and I can see some lively discussions in September too.
Steve.
Big and Bashful
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Re: Sari's

Post by Big and Bashful »

STEVIE wrote:Hi B&B
Man, I reckon that's quite a good idea actually. On the practical side you would have to find someone to perfect the wrap.
Otherwise, disaster?
Good thinking and I can see some lively discussions in September too.
Steve.
I have to admit, I can't see me wearing one in the middle of Glasgow! definitely an idea for lounging around the hoose though!
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Ralph
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Re: Sari's

Post by Ralph »

I like the appearance of saris, but I think I would be frustrated by the complicated process of wrapping and fitting. I prefer outfits I can just grab off the hanger (or as often as not, the pile on my floor) and throw on in seconds.
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mishawakaskirt
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Re: Sari's

Post by mishawakaskirt »

There are men's saree s.
It's more like a robe /caftan deal than the woman's flowing dress.

I own two Burmese Longyi s those are easy enough to step in to and tie.
I wear them around the house some, wife has not said too much about them.
They are inexpensive to buy. And would be easy to make. It's a literal tube of fabric. If you can sew a straight line you got it made.

As with all skirts. I'm uncomfortable outside the house, more so with the Longyi, because of the fear of it coming untied and falling down.

I probably have a false sense of security with my elastic waist skirts, nothing says that the elastic band won't fail on my skirts. I guess a fitted skirt with a belt is the safest way to go.
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Big and Bashful
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Re: Sari's

Post by Big and Bashful »

I have to admit, away from my own house I often wear skirts, but they are always "men's skirts", normally my old Midas cargo denim skirts. I wear other skirts in and around my own house, a favourite being a blue very full a-line elastic waist skirt, I also occasionaly stick on my 12 yard kilt, but that is heavy!
I like the feeling of loose clothing, like my sarong (not a tube, just a blob of cloth) but do fancy trying a sari type wrap to chill out in.
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crfriend
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Re: Sari's

Post by crfriend »

mishawakaskirt wrote:I probably have a false sense of security with my elastic waist skirts, nothing says that the elastic band won't fail on my skirts. I guess a fitted skirt with a belt is the safest way to go.
The failure mode on those is usually pretty slow in coming, so one has ample warning. If the skirt itself is still in good condition, it's usually possible -- and worthwhile -- to open up the "tunnel" and shoot another elastic through it thus solving the problem. I did that with three of my late ex-'s silk skirts and thus restored all three to wearable status instead of being "closet queens".

The other approach is to select skirts that in addition to elastic at the waist also have drawstrings; that way one has a safety-"belt" as it were.
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