a blog on style

Discussion of fashion elements and looks that are traditionally considered somewhat "femme" but are presented in a masculine context. This is NOT about transvestism or crossdressing.
Grok
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Re: a blog on style

Post by Grok »

jmiller842 wrote:
. Except for one little phrase near the end of the policy: "Management reserves the right to determine appropriateness." To me, that gives the company carte blanche to make any decision on dress code for any silly reason they want. That's their way out of any accusation of sexism, if I were to where a skirt to work.
Yes. I would assume that there are unwritten rules that don't appear directly (if at all) in the written dress code. Such as an unwritten rule against MIS. This sort of thing was already discussed in regards to boys and school dress codes.

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moonshadow
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Re: a blog on style

Post by moonshadow »

Grok wrote:
jmiller842 wrote:
. Except for one little phrase near the end of the policy: "Management reserves the right to determine appropriateness." To me, that gives the company carte blanche to make any decision on dress code for any silly reason they want. That's their way out of any accusation of sexism, if I were to where a skirt to work.
Yes. I would assume that there are unwritten rules that don't appear directly (if at all) in the written dress code. Such as an unwritten rule against MIS. This sort of thing was already discussed in regards to boys and school dress codes.
Yes, I would imagine that's about the way it would go. Unfortunately there will likely have to be a lot more men desiring to wear skirts before that will change. I can accept a company that doesn't allow it on the clock at this juncture. Where I draw the line is when companies take issue with it on the employees own time. Most don't concern their selves with it, but some do. I'm sorry, but I simply just don't get paid enough to allow any business to push me around on my own time.

Though uniforms are required in my field, the office workers go by a dress code that's similar to JMiller's, and though the office work isn't really "customer facing" anymore, I would imagine if I were say, a dispatcher or parts person who wore a skirt to work, I would be expected to go home and change. But I could be wrong... it's never been tried after all.
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Fred in Skirts
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Re: a blog on style

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I do not believe any company should have thee right to tell you what you can or can not wear on your own time. Some companies think they own you, they do not and as Moon says
I simply just don't get paid enough to allow any business to push me around on my own time.
For one thing when you are on their time you are representing the corporate image, BUT on your time you are not. I used to work for company back many years ago that wanted to know about what clubs and organizations I belonged to and what church I attended. They wanted to make sure the ones I belonged to would not besmirch the company image. Even though I only attended them during my off time and never on company time.

I used my own car because they would not give me a company car to run about in. So the general supervisor would inspect my car every time he visited our local office and told me I had to remove a bumper sticker the was for my favorite pastime Model Railroading. I refused to remove it and he then threatened me with dismissal, I told him, it was MY car and not the companies and I paid for the car, the gas and the insurance. If he did not like it he could give me a company car.... He backed down, not happily either. I kept the job for another year and found a better one.

The sticker was still on the car when I traded it in for a new one. :D
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moonshadow
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Re: a blog on style

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Fred in Skirts wrote:I used to work for company back many years ago that wanted to know about what clubs and organizations I belonged to and what church I attended.
It's actually against federal law to make employment decisions based on the applicant/employee's religious views (or lack thereof). Matters of religion should never be brought up in an interview or any other official setting between an employer and employee, save for reasonable employee request for religious accommodation(s).

It sounds like that past employer of yours was a real piece of work, though I'm not sure what time period this took place in. 20 years ago, that type of thing was actually pretty common from minimum wage baggers all the way up the corporate ladder.

In my own practice, I try to keep a thick wall between my home life and my work life. I do not mix them AT ALL, and that seems to keep me out of trouble for the most part.
Some companies think they own you, they do not and as Moon says
I like to think of it as I'm being "rented out". No, no company "owns" me.
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"Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation." - Benjamin Franklin

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Fred in Skirts
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Re: a blog on style

Post by Fred in Skirts »

moonshadow wrote:
Fred in Skirts wrote:I used to work for company back many years ago that wanted to know about what clubs and organizations I belonged to and what church I attended.
It's actually against federal law to make employment decisions based on the applicant/employee's religious views (or lack thereof). Matters of religion should never be brought up in an interview or any other official setting between an employer and employee, save for reasonable employee request for religious accommodation(s).
It sounds like that past employer of yours was a real piece of work, though I'm not sure what time period this took place in. 20 years ago, that type of thing was actually pretty common from minimum wage baggers all the way up the corporate ladder.
In my own practice, I try to keep a thick wall between my home life and my work life.
This was back when I was in my late 20's or early 30's some 40 or more years ago.
Fred :kiltdance:

"The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle."


"It is better to be hated for what you are than be loved for what you are not" Andre Gide: 1869 - 1951

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beachlion
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Re: a blog on style

Post by beachlion »

Some big companies might have had the attitude to have some say in your private life.
Around 1970 I was applying for a job at Shell as an engineer for drilling platforms in the Northsea. After my first interview a friend heard of my involvement with Shell. His older brother worked for Shell and I got some insights into the company culture. In my own time I was supposed to visit social events of the company, drive a car of a certain class, dress in a certain way if I was visiting offices and more. Doing so, fitting in the pattern, was the only way to climb the career ladder. My sense of freedom was already developed so I called them not to bother to invite me for a second interview.
All progress takes place outside the comfort zone - M J Bobak

Grok
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Re: a blog on style

Post by Grok »

moonshadow wrote: In my own practice, I try to keep a thick wall between my home life and my work life. I do not mix them AT ALL, and that seems to keep me out of trouble for the most part.
I am willing to work for a company with a fairly conservative dress code, but I also prefer a thick wall.

I don't live my personal life for the sake of the corporations.

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