Meaning of the word Kilt

Kilt-based fashions, both traditional and contemporary. Come on guys, bring on the pleats!

Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:28 am

Who created that meme that Vikings wore horns anyway? My personal guess would be some random costumer for a Wagner opera, but I may be wrong there. In any event, the notion of "horn-wearing warriors from seaward" is likely roughly from the same time-frame as all of the lore about tartans and The Kilt.

Carl...I have previously stated this.....There is now a Tartan registered to U.S. Marine Ex Veterans ,...
The Clerical Tartan as worn by Clergymen in America and Canada........
The Tartan registered to Jewish Clergymen.....

One of the Clans even had a Kilt made in America for their New Clan Chief at his Ordination in Scotland.....

The last of the Scottish Kilted Highland Regiments.....in the British Army.... The Royal Regiment of Scotland ,......
now has Figian Troops who wear The Black Watch Tartan......
The British M.O.D. even had the new Kilts made in Pakistan......

One of the British M.O.D. Kilt Disposal Companies told me that they were unable to outbid the Japanese
regarding the Disposal of British Kilts ,which probably ended up in America

If you designed a tartan for those employed in the World Wide Computer Industry, you might become rich and famous overnight.........
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 4:50 am

If one looks at the World Wide popularity of Kilt Wearing and of the Men in Skirts ...
the Men in Skirts is probably a more a more Economic and Practical Style of attire..

However there is a question as to how the style may become popular by acceptance in society................weeladdie
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby Sinned » Thu Apr 11, 2019 11:46 am

There wasn't a tradition with Vikings of burying helmets with other grave goods and armaments so authentic helmets are few and none have the horns. But apparently there is a tapestry that depicts a horned helmeted Viking. So who knows, maybe they did.
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby STEVIE » Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:49 pm

I have some questions;
Which clan has an "ordained" chief, the title is simply hereditary and honorary only in the vast majority of cases?
What relevance is there to the meaning or origin of the word "kilt" to modern life?
On what basis is the assertion made that kilt wearing in Scotland has declined, anecdotal or statistical?
What has the variety of available tartans got to do with the style of Viking Headgear?
Does the inclusion of frogmen, flying boats and dukws advance our understanding of anything in a meaningful way?
My only wish is that Since1982 could be here to give his thoughts on the subject.
That, gentlemen would have been very interesting indeed!
Steve.
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby Kirbstone » Fri Apr 12, 2019 2:45 am

Rob,
As we all know, Ireland is the only real banana republic in Europe. Fyffes have a humongously large banana distribution centre near Dundalk.!

The floatation fenders on the DUKWs used by Dublin Viking Tours are a Health & safety requirement when the vehicle is full of fare-paying revellers.

Yes, Dorset, Studland, Lulworth and Poole Hb. is a fascinating coastline/area....England's 'Durassic' coast, named I understand from the vast number of fossils found there. We often visited when we kept our shared GK29 at Hamble and more often than not there would be one of two yots aground in Poole Hb. awaiting a tide to get them off. Perhaps that's where a DUKW would come in handy....as a tow-off vehicle. They are very powerful. Re: priority, If you're aground, you're aground!

A lot of Poole Hb. is so shallow that it is more than wise to follow the marked channels. We've also had a fair few picnics on Brownsea Island, of course.

Tom
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:51 am

Kirbstone wrote:Rob,
As we all know, Ireland is the only real banana republic in Europe. Fyffes have a humongously large banana distribution centre near Dundalk.!

The floatation fenders on the DUKWs used by Dublin Viking Tours are a Health & safety requirement when the vehicle is full of fare-paying revellers.

Yes, Dorset, Studland, Lulworth and Poole Hb. is a fascinating coastline/area....England's 'Durassic' coast, named I understand from the vast number of fossils found there. We often visited when we kept our shared GK29 at Hamble and more often than not there would be one of two yots aground in Poole Hb. awaiting a tide to get them off. Perhaps that's where a DUKW would come in handy....as a tow-off vehicle. They are very powerful. Re: priority, If you're aground, you're aground!

A lot of Poole Hb. is so shallow that it is more than wise to follow the marked channels. We've also had a fair few picnics on Brownsea Island, of course.

Tom


Thanks Tom...We had a fleet of G K 24 's in Weymouth and Portland Harbour... Most of them had double barrelled names starting with G and K.
Lulworth, Durdle Door and Charmouth were the homes of the fossil hunters...West Bay, Charmouth and Lyme Regis are the home
of very unstable cliffs..so there is always a chance of a new find.

Poole Harbour with its mud flats and Double Tides was the home of many bilge keel Yachts...
My family had a hard chine 20 foot Hurly Felicity Bilge Keel Yacht for 20 years...in Portland Harbour....She dried out overnight in Poole Harbour
during her cruises....She even went up to Wareham Quay on the tide...sailing between the reed banks was a peaceful experience.

One year she was away for a month , and sailed as far as Chichester............
Newtown Creek on the I.O.W. was a good port of call for a shallow draft boat.........

When we raced to Poole from Weymouth , the fin keel yachts sometimes anchored overnight in South Deep...Into Poole Harbour Entrance
and turn Left....saves all the problems on Poole Quay, and saves time on the return trip to Portland Harbour.

We always took the Inshore Passage inside St Albans Race and sailed close to the coast to Swanage past the Purbeck Quarry whims
The stone cranes made from the masts of locally wrecked ships

I never found any explicit information regarding the rowing and sailing 20 foot barges which transported stone from the quarries to
Swanage Quay for banking and forwarding to building projects

The Streets of London were paved with Purbeck Stone ...Many buildings were re fronted with Purbeck Stone....The old building fronts
and original cast iron street bollards were returned to Swanage as ballast in the big sailing stone boats.

So Swanage is a seaside town with Old London Building Facades...............John Molem was the Contractor...an interesting story....Rod
Last edited by weeladdie18 on Sun Apr 14, 2019 9:55 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:08 am

There was a Bananna Run from The West Indies to Bristol ..In the U.K......
The Refrigeration in the ships controlled the ripening of the banannas
to ensure the fruit reached the market in prime condition......Rod
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Fri Apr 12, 2019 8:38 am

Holton Heath in the Purbecks was a Large Munitions Factory.....
To prevent the Germans bombing Holton Heath ...decoy petrol petrol fires were lit on Brownsea Island.....

Many of the planes turned and discharged their bombs on Swanage.....Swanage received more Air Raids than London...
My old family home was bombed twice....the family were unable to return to their home until the early Fifties

Worth Matravers , just south west of Swanage was home to the High Early Warning mast arrays....High on the cliffs....

Much of the Horsa Glider production for the D. Day landings was carried out in the Poole area....
there were several airfields in the area..........Bournemouth Airport is now a big international airport
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:21 am

Tom... There is probably a more modern Type of Amphibious D.U.K.W. used for transporting Personnel and stores from Marazion
To St Michaels Mount in Cornwall ....Many of the commercial Supplies delivery vehicles have to wait for low tide to cross
The Causeway to the Island...
There was also a Duck type vehicle used in North Devon in the Appledore / Instow area....

If I remember correctly Instow had a Marinisation unit to develop the wading capabilities of the vehicles which landed on the D.Day beaches
during the Assault landings.
There is a museum which had a display of the Funnies which were the Royal Engineers special assault equipment used to clear the mines
and barbed wire from the beaches...Chain flails and flame throwers were developed for the tanks.
The Rocket powered giant wheel was a failure as its movement could not be controlled
I remember reading about this project in the John Bull Magazine when I was a Kid
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Re: Meaning of the word Kilt

Postby weeladdie18 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:30 am

there was a Baily Bridge Section at Westward Ho...The Ducks had a base at Westward Ho.. They went over the Bridge and swam to Instow.

Down here In Cornwall they will be having a yellow plastic duck race in one of the village streams
....not quite the same shape as your Banana D.U.K.W............L.O.L.
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