Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Clippings from news sources involving fashion freedom and other gender equality issues.
weeladdie18
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Re: Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Post by weeladdie18 »

When the Navy were called in to blow up a mine in the sea , all the fishing boats
waited for the local fish stock to be blown to the surface so they had an easy
catch with ruptured swim bladders

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Kirbstone
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Re: Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Post by Kirbstone »

Ah yes Rod, Semtex & similar are in short supply here since they finished blowing up all the peat-electric cooling towers. Our most lethal agent is now slug pellets!
The birds airlifted canal reed seeds to our lake and the resulting infestation just cannot be eliminated, only chopped each year at low water-table Summer time.
The otters aren't interested in local coarse fish, so they don't visit anymore.

Tom

P.S. Another lethal substance is creosote, difficult to buy now in sufficient strength, but good for killing grass to maintain Badminton lines on our 'sports field'.
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Carpe Diem......Seize the Day !

Stu
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Re: Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Post by Stu »

I used to work about 40% from home. Now I work 100% from home.

I miss the company of colleagues, but in some ways it's less stressful and I can plan my work as I like.

pelmut
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Re: Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Post by pelmut »

Kirbstone wrote:
Sat May 02, 2020 10:13 am
P.S. Another lethal substance is creosote, difficult to buy now in sufficient strength, but good for killing grass to maintain Badminton lines on our 'sports field'.
Even better was 'Tar Varnish', which could burn holes in clothing and damage your skin.  A shed painted in that stuff wouldn't need more treatment for at least 10 years (you wouldn't do it any earlier because you would still remember what a dreadful job it was the last time).  

It was also useful for keeping vandals out of the garden; I piled some scrap iron across the hole in the hedge and covered it with tar varnish -- that stopped them!
There is no such thing as a normal person, only someone you don't know very well yet.

weeladdie18
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Re: Coronavirus, how are you managing at home?

Post by weeladdie18 »

Tom As a subject The Lost Harbours of Cornwall does show that navigatable creeks
naturally silt up. There is am inufficiently high water table to naturally scour any navigable
channel . Eventualy the harbour areas become Fields.....Regular dredging becomes
Uneconomic...So the landscape becomes fields and then housing developments

The evidence shown does indicate that this is a gradual change
from say Roman times to the present day.
What my happen to your lake may be a build up of reeds
and then more mud flats ,then cultivated fields.
Perhaps this idea of an artificial lake with shoals of imported
fish was a non starter...The whole idea of a fishing lake
was perhaps a rich mans dream.I am not considering your lake
personally ,but as an environmental change in your residential
region.......One of the concepts which does seem to be
surving in our lifetime is the string of water board lakes
with watersports and angling...There is plenty of money available
to tart up a reservoir..

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