Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

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Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby FranTastic444 » Mon Dec 24, 2018 1:52 am

The Lewis Hamilton furore regarding the comment he made about his nephew wearing a dress has been covered in Skirt Cafe in the past.

Here is a fashion article in GQ magazine in which Hamilton takes on that incident and talks about his new line of clothing, which includes kilts (I like the patchwork tartan kilt).
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby moonshadow » Mon Dec 24, 2018 3:59 am

Well... I can say this... he sure won't be sneaking up on anyone anytime soon... :mrgreen:
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby Sinned » Mon Dec 24, 2018 9:32 pm

Call me a cynic but, having generated a storm of protests for his comments which were quite savage to a young boy, he shows remorse and repentance and then, in the same breath, demonstrate that he is on the side of the male skirt wearer by sporting a kilt [0] or two and championing his own collection. Never really did like Hamilton, seems a bit stuck-up and distant to me. Even Schuey managed to display more warmth and humour [1]. And I would argue that he is not our greatest F1 driver. Most successful maybe, in terms of World Championships and GP's won, technically great perhaps, single-minded certainly, but for sheer guts and courage, no.

[0] Note, kilt which is "safe" rather than skirt or dress.
[1] For a German, not noted for their sense of humour, although they must have one.
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby FranTastic444 » Wed Dec 26, 2018 1:21 am

Comparing drivers across the years is always going to be difficult. F1 cars are safer than ever and are less powerful than a few years back and they also have tech like semi automatic gearboxes, team radio etc. that drivers of old did not benefit from. For this reason I think you can only compare a driver with his peers from the same era and, IMHO, Hamilton has often bettered those around him (though at most times he has been in a car / team that is at / near the front of the pack).

Although I'm sure that there are exceptions, it seems that Hamilton has won most of his battles through fair means rather than foul, unlike Schumacher who has done some really underhand things over the years. If you were to do a Myers Briggs test on these guys you would find that the are ultra competitive and ruthless. Fact is, these traits that get them to the top of an ultra competitive and ruthless industry (and lets them stay atop of a very slippery pole for a while) doesn't necessarily make them the most empathetic or likeable of people. I (indirectly) know someone who has a child who is thought of as one of the top racers in the UK right now (talk of a possible F1 career) and he has talked about the challenges of getting his kid to the top. Even if you have skill, the right mentality and dedication and you have connections, mentors and even patrons, without a LOT of cash behind you it is very difficult to make a career of F1. Would Lance Stroll be where he is now without the backing of a billionaire dad? The fact that Hamilton got to the top from pretty humble beginnings is testament to his skill as a driver as well as how hard he and his dad have worked to get to Hamilton being a multiple F1 winner.

A very quick story, that *might* change your opinion of Hamilton a little. He was contacted by a club I'm a member of about a 24 year old fan of his who'd just been diagnosed with terminal cancer and had been given 2 months to live. Within the space of a week a factory tour had been arranged where he spent time with her. This is mid-season where his time is very limited.

Regarding the kilt, Hamilton has spoken for some time about a career after F1 including music and fashion. I'm normally a pretty skeptical kind of guy, but I'll give Hamilton a pass on this one. The clothing line was probably already lined up and, whilst the timing might have been fortuitous, I see the kilt thing as a genuine stab at making good on earlier damage rather than being any sort of cynical or manipulative stunt. I'm sure that we have all done and said some really stupid things over the years but because many of these things were done prior to the advent of the Internet and social meedjya and because we aren't rich / famous where every public word we utter comes under close scrutiny, we got away with it. I'll certainly not be casting the first stone on this one :-)
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby bridkid » Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:12 am

[1] For a German, not noted for their sense of humour, although they must have one.[/quote]

'The German sense of humour is no laughing matter.' Attrib. the late, great Spike Milligan..
If it aint Yorkshire, it's crap!
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby Sinned » Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:40 pm

Do you mean Spike Milligna that well-known typing error? His own description.
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby geron » Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:16 am

bridkid wrote:[1] For a German, not noted for their sense of humour, although they must have one.

'The German sense of humour is no laughing matter.' Attrib. the late, great Spike Milligan..

This is a dreadful old stereotype, and we really shouldn't be keeping it alive now, even to revive one of Spike Milligan's gags -- much less to provide tabloid clichés for reports of international football matches etc.

Today's Germans are deeply uncomfortable about their country's past and have agonized endlessly about coming to terms with it. They are civilized and cultured people and no-one who has had a conversation with with one of them could pretend that they lack a sense of humour. For additional evidence, just check out their TV, easily receivable in the UK. Furthermore, they laughed their heads off at repeats of Monty Python and other British humour, and will be doing so again -- many times -- on New Year's Eve with this old treasure:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinner_for_One
So let's just lay this to rest.
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby SkirtsDad » Fri Dec 28, 2018 9:58 am

About twenty years ago I flew to Hamburg with a work colleague. We hired a car and were thinking about how long it might take to get to Hanover. My colleague asked the woman at the hire desk "Do you know how far it is to Hanover?" and in a very serious tone and with all the gravitas that question deserved and with not one hint of a smile she answered "Yes". We paused, no smile came, she got on with her work. She had efficiently answered the question.
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Re: Lewis Hamilton GQ Article

Postby andrewsh » Fri Dec 28, 2018 10:59 am

SkirtsDad wrote:About twenty years ago I flew to Hamburg with a work colleague. We hired a car and were thinking about how long it might take to get to Hanover. My colleague asked the woman at the hire desk "Do you know how far it is to Hanover?" and in a very serious tone and with all the gravitas that question deserved and with not one hint of a smile she answered "Yes". We paused, no smile came, she got on with her work. She had efficiently answered the question.


While definitely funny, I believe this has been a case of a language barrier. To someone who’s not a native English speaker, that question may sound as Do you know or not how far is it? not Could you please share this information is you possess it?
It may also sound as Hannover is very far, isn’t it, do you agree?
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