A Tiny Houseboat

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Uncle Al
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A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Uncle Al »

I think you'll like this :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DD9-oHIQ-4U

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denimini
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by denimini »

Yes, that appeals to me. I have been fiddling around with similar ideas (but not so flash) for the river as I have about 500kms of navigable river from the front of my house (when the level is high enough).
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Kirbstone
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Kirbstone »

Very clever design & construction. I can see it would appeal to a lot of inland waters users. On this Emerald isle however, the big problem is wind. We get an awful lot of it and regrettably that sort of boat would sustain serious damage before long in this neck-o'-the -woods.

Inland waterways cruisers here are squatter and much deeper in the water. Larger ones tend also to have bow thrusters to help get in & out of marinas in windy conditions, which is most days and you could count on one hand the calm days here when that boat could safely cross one of our (e.g. Shannon) lakes.

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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Big and Bashful »

I think there are a lot of good ideas there that could be used on other boats, but the windage on that? coupled with the short length and high width? somehow I can't see that being a comfortable home in a Force 10 on the Scottish West coast! It wouldn't work on the UK canal network either, too wide for most of the network and too high for most tunnels and bridges.

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Sinned
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Sinned »

My father bought a banana barge and renovated it. It was a lot longer than the one shown. It was an old working vessel used for conveying anything from coal to wheat and on side view had the curve of a banana, hence the name. That is, the prow and stern were higher that the middle. The boat was gutted to the hull and living quarters constructed within the hull. The barge has been sold now but it was apparently only one of three of its type in our country still seaworthy. I don't have any photos but my mum will have but I can't see her at the moment as we are in lock down.
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Faldaguy »

Enjoyed the attention to detail of combining the needs of a boat with the comforts of a vacation. As other's noted, not suitable on the waters many of us have plied, but the components could be put to other hulls, I wish them well in finding a market.
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by pelmut »

That's positively agoraphobic compared to my van conversion, but a lot more comfortable.
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by denimini »

pelmut wrote:
Sat Jan 23, 2021 11:53 am
That's positively agoraphobic compared to my van conversion, but a lot more comfortable.
Your van conversion must be like a "Popemobile" :)
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by pelmut »

The floor of the load space is 5' 2" x 8' 0" with wheel arches intruding into 7" of the width each side, leaving 4ft x 8ft clear for carrying standard sizes of building sheets (insulation, plasterboard, plywood etc.).  The 7" width each side is the only space available to house all the fixed 'domestic' items, so that the floor space can be left clear when it is needed for 'industrial' mode.

On the nearside, the side space just behind the cab bulkhead is taken up by a sliding door and its footwell, so nothing permanent can go in there.  Behind the footwell is a dresser, 7" deep and the whole available wall height, with a hinge-down kitchen worktop that covers the shelves to prevent things falling off them when it is closed.  Below the worktop level are two cupboards (over the wheel arch) with doors that open to form support brackets for the worktop.  The back corner is occupied by a foot-operated water pump supplied from a clean water container above it; the water is pumped up to a spout at roof level and falls into a funnel that serves as a sink, leading to a dirty water container.  These items are closely fitted around the back door stay mechanism and there is also just room for a soap dish and towel.

On the offside, the side wall behind the driver has a 3ft long row of hooks from which hang the bedding and air mattresses in kit bags; all the coats etc.  On the floor below them is a boxed-in diesel heater with a metal jerrycan of diesel and a plastic jerrycan of water (both exactly 7"" thick).  The wall over the back wheel arch is shelved full height and the back corner houses the waste bag and fire extinguisher.

On the nearside back door is a hinged platform that can be let down and pegged to the worktop, above it is a metal fold-out cooker hood with ventilation holes at the top of the door.  I have a diesel pressure stove that fits onto the platform and the hood safely catches the flames and smoke that it sometimes emits when the startup procedure doesn't go according to plan.  The reason for not using propane is that no decent capacity gas bottle will fit in the 7" width available.

A rolled-up carpet hangs in slings from the roof and this can be unrolled on the floor when required. All the tools and equipment of the van are housed in ex-army ammunition boxes, along with emergency food and clothing.  In 'domestic' mode, these can be stacked up and covered with a folded blanket to make bench seats; an inflated air bed can be propped on edge to form a back rest and the portable toilet doubles as an extra seat.  At night, the ammo boxes are stacked out of the way and the air mattresses laid on the floor.

All very compact, fairly comfortable ...but definitely lacking in luxury.
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

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by pelmut » Sat Jan 23, 2021 10:34 am

The floor of the load space is 5' 2" x 8' 0" with wheel arches intruding into 7" of the width each side, leaving 4ft x 8ft clear for carrying standard sizes of building sheets (insulation, plasterboard, plywood etc.). The 7" width each side is the only space available to house all the fixed 'domestic' items, so that the floor space can be left clear when it is needed for 'industrial' mode.

On the nearside, the side space just behind the cab bulkhead is ...
A rolled-up carpet hangs in slings from the roof and this can be unrolled on the floor when required. All the tools and equipment of the van are housed in ex-army ammunition boxes, along with emergency food and clothing. In 'domestic' mode, these can be stacked up and covered with a folded blanket to make bench seats; an inflated air bed can be propped on edge to form a back rest and the portable toilet doubles as an extra seat. At night, the ammo boxes are stacked out of the way and the air mattresses laid on the floor.

All very compact, fairly comfortable ...but definitely lacking in luxury.
Pelmut;
Your detail of fitting it all in took me back to the Patrol rig we used in AU for an 18 month tour. We did have a 13' pull-trailer that we used most of the time; but when the going really got a bit rough, it was just us and the Patrol. However, we did not suffer as the pictures attached show--we lacked for nothing. Yes, I had a couple of large bundles on the roof, but most of the gear was tucked under the bed so the bunk space was readily available anytime. It is amazing what can be done in a small space, with planning. The "Tiny House" industry is full of amazing little notions to make fewer things and smaller spaces accomplish more than one would ever imagine. I continue to be amazed at what local chaps accomplish with their one ubiquitous tool -- the machete.

The last picture is an Aussie brand: Thunder Down Under!


https://www.dropbox.com/sh/4j8583kbluic ... Iu4WoyJ23a
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by pelmut »

I couldn't get that link to work on my usual computer, but I've now managed to open it on another one. How on earth did you get all that kit into one vehicle?

My pictures are at: http://www.poppyrecords.co.uk/Van/vanconversion.htm
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by Faldaguy »

Thoughtful & nifty design aps in your rig. As to getting all the gear in ours -- the big difference is in that we did all of our activity outside, except sleeping. We picked our travel for optimum weather conditions (usually did OK, but a few swollen rivers in NSW played havoc). Anyway, the below bunk space and roof packs allow for a lot of gear if you plan it. Given our years of travel, it seems to be one knack I've 'perfected'. Remembering the logic of what went where was sometimes more of a challenge! :?
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denimini
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by denimini »

pelmut wrote:
Mon Jan 25, 2021 1:24 pm
My pictures are at: http://www.poppyrecords.co.uk/Van/vanconversion.htm
That is an adaptable setup. Usually a camper van is limited to just that at the expense of any normal use. Not many people can afford 2 vans.
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Kirbstone
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

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Getting away from floating things, MOH has owned a VW camper for nigh-on 30 years. Initially a1987 T2 VW with a mighty flat four 1600CC turbodiesel in the stern. Short w/base gave it a see-saw ride, due to the long overhangs both ends and the Irish motor tax regs stipulate a fixed permanent high roof with headroom to avail of cheap rates, which exacerbated that ride feature.

She flogged it privately to an adventure-seeking youngster and bought a VW T4 panel van 2003 with a stonking 5-pot 2.7 turbo up front. Much longer between the axles meant no see-saw and we had a high roof & side windows professionally fitted. Then muggins here got the appropriate bits and stuck in the obligatory sink & cooker plus cabinets & drawers &c., also the convertible rear bench-to-bed unit. Useful DIY, but.....

Fact is, it's too small for both of us to be comfortable camping in and the arrival of a granddaughter to live with us long-term put the kybosh on any touring ideas using it. MOH uses it for her personal transport and enjoys the space & capacity for herself. Down at our Kerry bolthole it's a godsend for transporting family plus clobber to & from the beach, but that's about all.

I drive it sometimes when MOH is fatigued, but the cramped upright driving position is a painintheass. I vastly prefer my grown-up Volvo.

Not being into racing foils, my floating boats need to have about three tons of lead pointed more-or-less down towards the Center of the Earth and wind power.

Tom
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pelmut
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Re: A Tiny Houseboat

Post by pelmut »

Kirbstone wrote:
Tue Jan 26, 2021 11:46 am
... the Irish motor tax regs stipulate a fixed permanent high roof with headroom to avail of cheap rates
There's a very strange 'definition' of what constitutes a camper in England, including the probability (but not necessity) that it is decorated with the manufacturer's logo, the probability (but not necessity) that it is fitted with an extendable roof and side canopy and the probability (but not necessity) that it has fixed beds that are moveable and fixed cooking and washing appliances that may also be moveable.  I should be surprised if anyone can make sense of that.

In any case, there doesn't seem to be any reason to distinguish it from an ordinary van because they are both taxed the same and both subject to the same (rather strange) set of speed limits that don't apply to other vehicles.
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