Rain!

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Re: Rain!

Postby denimini » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:54 am

Caultron wrote:
Big and Bashful wrote:Since it has rained all day today, I thought I would check yhe annual rainfall figure for a place I used to work, just a few miles away from my house. 1491 mm annual rainfall. Hmm! that amount of rain and midges as well, how did kilts catch on?

Here in Phoenix, AZ, we've had 6.5" (16.5 cm) of rain so far this year.

That is getting as bad as here with 5.5 cm this year. We both are in dry climates but a drought in a dry climate is really dry.
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Re: Rain!

Postby Caultron » Mon Oct 08, 2018 5:57 pm

denimini wrote:...We both are in dry climates but a drought in a dry climate is really dry.

We've been in drought here as well, although getting 6-7 inches of rail a year isn't that noticable compared to 8-9.

The problem shows up much more on a regional scale, where the entire southwest United States has an ever-diminishing supply of drinking water. In a few years we may be facing mandatory conservation.
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Re: Rain!

Postby beachlion » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:17 pm

Caultron wrote:...... We've been in drought here as well, although getting 6-7 inches of rail a year isn't that noticable compared to 8-9.

The problem shows up much more on a regional scale, where the entire southwest United States has an ever-diminishing supply of drinking water. In a few years we may be facing mandatory conservation.


Indeed. As long as companies are allowed to dump their waist in rivers and lakes and other companies are pumping the pure water in massive amounts from the deep and bottle it, we might have a big problem in the making.
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Re: Rain!

Postby weeladdie18 » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:23 pm

By the spring my Cornish Garden is usually fairly soggy....Normally the camp sites are suffering with rain in August.My grass is slowly recovering.
I would certainly say this has been an unusually dry year. .......This year the Council Highways dept made a serious effort to dig out the deep drainage
ditches. We may or may not suffer from heavy rain early in the new year. Many years ago it was considered that our weather worked in 35 year
cycles....We have had more Prevailng wind moving from South westerly to North westerly direction......It has been continually claimed that the
Jet Stream has moved south by 500 miles. We have suffered from extreme winter gale damage...so who can say what is likely to occur this winter.
Our blizzards were unusual. However the blizzards in the 1880s were more extreme and two weeks later into the spring.
January to march 1964 was the worst winter and spring that I can remember....snow on the ground for three months from boxing day.
This years dry August was unusual....There again we might have an extremely wet or windy winter season......With the issue of bottled water
I would imagine most of it goes down the drain and back into the recycling system.....Weeladdie
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Re: Rain!

Postby weeladdie18 » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:49 pm

bridkid wrote:
weeladdie18 wrote:Come on Brit Kid....you must think positively ......start a wardrobe of warmer skirts for the winter, with a nice long Winter Coat.
Charity Shops are a good place to search for new to you clothes. search four charity shops in half a day...great fun.
..
Today I am wearing a summer skirt over a thick skirt ..Like many others I go for skirts with elasticated waist bands.
I will admit that It does take time to sort out a nice skirt outfit...........
Two skirts , two sweaters and a male sports jacket today.........Just replace your trousers with a nice warm skirt........weeladdie


I've tried all that weeladdie, I just can't get on with it...I only feel comfortable in a skirt if it's above the knee, and I'm bare legged. I also really feel the cold, so it looks like I'm a fair weather skirter....


Today I did go bare legged with a pair of Knee high flat soled zip up boots and bare legs. I found that was a marked improvement. Still not wearing 15 dernier stockings.
I rarely wear 50 Dernier tights or woollen Tights.....If all else fails Perhaps leggings under a light weight skirt might be a successful alternative.
The lassies seem to like this style of attire. I feel that we may individually go for our own alternative style of attire which we find successful.
I do consider my personal aim is to avoid loose fitting trousers or a garment with a crutch panel and loose fitting legs.
Thicker sports drawers ,over knee socks or long footless leg warmers might work...this sort of gear is stocked in
dance, sports and gymnastic outfitters. It is surprising the gear the male will wear for motor cycling or on a cold parade ground.
Before War 11, cyclists wore tights over their shorts in cold weather..................
However a heavy weight traditional Kilt is worn , the thick garment will stand up to extremely cold weather .There are records which show how the
20 ounce Kilt of WW I was worn in extremely cold conditions.........I am small and slim ; with a bit of experimenting I have managed to stay warm in a skirt or a Kilt... .............I would agree with Carl...a long skirt works....
Long with knee high boots ...no leg covering . Just layers of skirts underneath ; ..that worked for me today....
I hear we are due for another heat wave next week...... Best of luck ........weeladdie
Last edited by weeladdie18 on Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:27 pm, edited 8 times in total.
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Re: Rain!

Postby Caultron » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:04 pm

beachlion wrote:Indeed. As long as companies are allowed to dump their waist in rivers and lakes and other companies are pumping the pure water in massive amounts from the deep and bottle it, we might have a big problem in the making.

The issue of bottled water came up recently when Nestle applied for a permit to operate a bottled water plant here in Phoenix. With water scarce, the opponents protested, why would we want an industry that shipped it out by the trainload?

But the city council approved it because the water was just, um, a drop in the bucket, and because it was a clean industry that would generate much-needed tax revenue.

Most experts here blame the drought on global warming, which reduces the rainfall and snowfall in the mountains. As a result the Colorado River keeps delivering less and less water every year, and so water levels in the reservoirs keep dropping.

Most people here who don't drink tap water object to a sulfur odor that the water picks up from the ground or to the small amount of chlorine added to prevent fouling between the water treatment plant and the tap.
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Re: Rain!

Postby crfriend » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:16 pm

Caultron wrote:Most experts here blame the drought on global warming, which reduces the rainfall and snowfall in the mountains. As a result the Colorado River keeps delivering less and less water every year, and so water levels in the reservoirs keep dropping.

It used to be that the Colorado River reached the sea. It doesn't any more, and the point where the last of it evaporates before reaching the Pacific moves northward year after year. You guys have a real problem in this regard, and I don't know of any easy answers. But, of course, climate change is a hoax and fake news.

Around here, March is the new February. The rate of change has accelerated to the point where it's discernible in the span of a human lifetime.
Most people here who don't drink tap water object to a sulfur odor that the water picks up from the ground or to the small amount of chlorine added to prevent fouling between the water treatment plant and the tap.

Chlorine is easily dealt with simply by putting tap-water into a 3/4-filled jug, agitating it, and venting the result. Sulphur is much more pernicious and not something I'd enjoy.
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Re: Rain!

Postby Caultron » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:47 pm

crfriend wrote:It used to be that the Colorado River reached the sea. It doesn't any more, and the point where the last of it evaporates before reaching the Pacific moves northward year after year. You guys have a real problem in this regard, and I don't know of any easy answers. But, of course, climate change is a hoax and fake news.

Actually, the Colorado River technically flows into the Gulf of California and not the Pacific. It's true that most years there's no more water at that point, but the reason is consumption rather than evaporation.

States all along the river, including Colorado, Nevada, California, and Arizona, collect water for both city and agricultural use. By treaty the US has to let a certain amount flow into Mexico but Mexico typically uses that entire allocation and leaves nothing to flow into the gulf.

We do the same thing here in Phoenix. The Salt River carries water from the mountain in Eastern Arizona into Phoenix and that's how the Indians and early settlers were able to survive. And you can still ride an inner tube down it; for a fee the Indians supply the tubes and rides back to the parking lot. But there's a dam just east of Phoenix that captures the entire flow and uses it for city water. And no, there's no spot on the west side where the treated sewage reenters the river flow. Instead, it's used for things like watering parks and golf courses.
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Re: Rain!

Postby crfriend » Tue Oct 09, 2018 12:03 am

Caultron wrote:Actually, the Colorado River technically flows into the Gulf of California and not the Pacific. It's true that most years there's no more water at that point, but the reason is consumption rather than evaporation.

Indeed, and I stand corrected on that point. It's the second one, "It's consumption rather than evaporation" that was the crux of my comment. The river is so depleted over its natural course that it never reaches the sea.
The Salt River carries water from the mountain in Eastern Arizona into Phoenix and that's how the Indians and early settlers were able to survive. And you can still ride an inner tube down it; for a fee the Indians supply the tubes and rides back to the parking lot. But there's a dam just east of Phoenix that captures the entire flow and uses it for city water. And no, there's no spot on the west side where the treated sewage reenters the river flow. Instead, it's used for things like watering parks and golf courses.

I like the creativity used in that particular situation -- and it's a good thing that happens. Out of curiosity, is there any flow in the river downstream of the dam?

However, the real issue is a lack of snowfall in the mountains and what looks like an overpopulation problem in a sensitive and fragile area.

In the east we know that large swathes of the eastern seaboard are going to have to be abandoned in the coming decades. That's just the way it's going; it's going to be "drowning by inches" as sea-level rises. I wonder if the west is contemplating the notion of abandonment as well. It's not a pretty picture.
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Re: Rain!

Postby Caultron » Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:17 am

crfriend wrote:I like the creativity used in that particular situation -- and it's a good thing that happens. Out of curiosity, is there any flow in the river downstream of the dam?

No, they take it all.

crfriend wrote:...it's going to be "drowning by inches" as sea-level rises. I wonder if the west is contemplating the notion of abandonment as well. It's not a pretty picture.

Phoenix, for example, is 1200-1300 feet above sea level, so we're not likely to become beach property or get drowned out.

As to abandonedment, agriculture is a more likely victim than cities. But the world still needs cotton and vegies. No one wants to think about limits on urban growth but I suppose it's possible.
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Re: Rain!

Postby Kirbstone » Thu Oct 11, 2018 7:04 pm

Our much-promised rain for today hardly wet the bottom of our dog-bowls. Perhaps we can top Phoenix, but not by much.

No boating possible at home for some months, now and launching a boat at our local reservoir is now very problematic. I'm not prepared to visit the sludge at water level there until things change.

Tom
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