TRUTH

General discussion of skirt and kilt-based fashion for men, and stuff that goes with skirts and kilts.

TRUTH

Postby moonshadow » Mon Jun 17, 2019 11:25 pm

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Re: TRUTH

Postby JeffB1959 » Tue Jun 18, 2019 12:22 am

I’m down with that! :lol:
I don't want to LOOK like a woman, I just want to DRESS like a woman.
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Re: TRUTH

Postby 6ft3Aussie » Tue Jun 18, 2019 12:45 am

I can feel the breeze!!!

So true though.
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Re: TRUTH

Postby Fred in Skirts » Tue Jun 18, 2019 1:57 am

I could not have said it better!! 8)
Fred :kiltdance:

:whistle: Hi I am Fred and I wear skirts and dresses all of the time. :hooray:
"It is better to be hated for what you are than be loved for what you are not"
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Re: TRUTH

Postby denimini » Tue Jun 18, 2019 12:41 pm

............... and the sun rises in the morning.

I can understand men wearing shorts, only if they have never tried a skirt.
Anthony, a denim miniskirt wearer in Outback Australia
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Re: TRUTH

Postby mishawakaskirt » Tue Jun 18, 2019 2:52 pm

Very true, sadly women customers apparently don't agree, and men don't know any better.

I believe that the tag says Sierra Designs
I went to a website with the same name.
No skirts came up in my searches, they do have a 70 plus dollars dress for sale.

I'll never figure out why camping and hiking clothing is so expensive.

Or why so few people wear skirts. The comfortable lost secret.
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Avoid the middle man, wear a kilt or skirt.
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Re: TRUTH

Postby skirtpettiman » Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:32 pm

Absolutely agree. Especially in hot summer weather (which we haven't got here in Britain right now; had a good few days of 13-17 deg. C (55-63 deg. F)).
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Re: TRUTH

Postby skirtyscot » Sun Jun 23, 2019 12:11 am

mishawakaskirt wrote:I'll never figure out why camping and hiking clothing is so expensive.

Or why so few people wear skirts. The comfortable lost secret.

My hiking skirt is one of the most expensive I have, though that's because I bought it new but most of the others came from Ebay. I wore it today for a walk up a mountain, first time for ages. It was a warm afternoon and I reckoned it would be more comfortable than trousers. And I was right. Though when you're walking, the difference in comfort between trousers and a skirt is less than at other times.

Scottish mountains are not a place to go if you want to see people in skirts. Apart from myself, I've only ever seen one.
Keep on skirting,

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Re: TRUTH

Postby crfriend » Sun Jun 23, 2019 1:46 am

skirtyscot wrote:My hiking skirt is one of the most expensive I have, though that's because I bought it new but most of the others came from Ebay. I wore it today for a walk up a mountain, first time for ages. It was a warm afternoon and I reckoned it would be more comfortable than trousers. And I was right. Though when you're walking, the difference in comfort between trousers and a skirt is less than at other times.

I went sailing today in my Macabi -- which was purpose-bought for that pass-time. I have more expensive skirts to be sure, but the Macabi didn't come cheap -- and it's held up like a champ for several years of getting stepped on, caught on things, and unceremoniously shoved one way or the other to kee[ it out of the way or from getting blown up around my head and exposing way too much information (i.e. next week's laundry).
Retrocomputing -- It's not just a job, it's an adventure!
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Re: TRUTH

Postby STEVIE » Sun Jun 23, 2019 3:31 pm

skirtyscot wrote:Scottish mountains are not a place to go if you want to see people in skirts. Apart from myself, I've only ever seen one.


In all the time that I hill walked I only ever saw a female in a hiking skirt.
I can't remember even seeing a guy in a kilt.
Trousers can really be a better option both in terms of the climate and as a barrier to ticks.
The truth here is that practical considerations should really have the greater priority.
Steve.
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Re: TRUTH

Postby skirtyscot » Mon Jun 24, 2019 8:09 am

If I hadn't worn the skirt, I'd have worn shorts, so my legs would have been almost as exposed. And there wasn't a lot of long grass along the path so the risk was low. I've never had a tick though I've been up loads of mountains in shorts, so is it possible that they don't like me?
Keep on skirting,

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Re: TRUTH

Postby dillon » Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:10 am

skirtyscot wrote:If I hadn't worn the skirt, I'd have worn shorts, so my legs would have been almost as exposed. And there wasn't a lot of long grass along the path so the risk was low. I've never had a tick though I've been up loads of mountains in shorts, so is it possible that they don't like me?

Not a big country music fan, but occasionally I find a song I like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tiPndMqxLQ

I have yet to find a single tick this summer, but snakes are everywhere. A friend of my sister got bitten by a copperhead, and while at the hospital was told they had had five other snakebite victims to treat just that one day! Then I got home and on Facebook to discover that one of my own friends had been bitten by a copperhead on his hand. Any of you southern guys, be careful when you reach down to pull that weed or pick up a discarded beer can. The early heat we had this spring produced a bumper hatch-out of copperheads.
As a matter of fact, the sun DOES shine out of my ...
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Re: TRUTH

Postby Fred in Skirts » Tue Jun 25, 2019 2:53 am

Snakes why does it have to be snakes? :twisted:

One of gods creations that I hate with a passion. So far I haven't seen any of the poisonous type but a lot of the others.
Fred :kiltdance:

:whistle: Hi I am Fred and I wear skirts and dresses all of the time. :hooray:
"It is better to be hated for what you are than be loved for what you are not"
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Re: TRUTH

Postby dillon » Tue Jun 25, 2019 3:43 pm

Fred in Skirts wrote:Snakes why does it have to be snakes? :twisted:

One of gods creations that I hate with a passion. So far I haven't seen any of the poisonous type but a lot of the others.

I haven't encountered a copperhead yet this summer either (that I have seen) but a few others, mostly some sizeable blacksnakes, one of which my wife mistook for the garden hose and was bending to pick up when it slithered away. She spent the rest of the day cloistered inside the house. :shock:
As a matter of fact, the sun DOES shine out of my ...
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Re: TRUTH

Postby Fred in Skirts » Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:40 pm

Where I live in South Carolina we have several poisonous snakes. :( Many are right in my back garden... :(

We have the Eastern Diamond Back rattlesnake.
The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is South Carolina’s
largest venomous snake. Adults of this species range
from 3 to 5 feet in length and occasionally reach lengths in
excess of 6 feet. The diamondback gets its name from the
series of dark-brown to black “diamonds” running down the
rattlesnake’s back. Each dark diamond is outlined in yellow
to cream-white and sits on a background varying from light
brown to olive. The diamondback has a black mask across
its eyes, thought to hide its eyes from potential prey.
The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is found in longleaf
pine flatwoods, rolling pine-hills and in maritime grasslands
of the lower coast. Diamondbacks typically spend winter
months in a stump-hole but spend most of their time above ground during the warmer months of the year.
Diamondbacks, like other pit vipers, are ambush predators.
They sit and wait, in cover, for prey to come to them.
The infrared, heat-sensing pits on their faces help them
detect warm-blooded prey. They feed primarily on rabbits,
squirrels, cotton rats and other large rodents.
Both the eastern diamondback rattlesnake, and its relative
the timber rattlesnake, mate and give birth during late
summer and early fall. Gravid females, which will give
birth in a given year, do not mate. This unusual life history
results in biennial (every other year) reproduction for these
species.


The Timber Rattlesnake
The timber rattlesnake is a large, 3- to 5 foot rattlesnake that is
found throughout South Carolina. This species has two different
“forms” in our state: the mountain form, often referred to as the
timber rattlesnake, and the piedmont-coastal form, referred to as
the canebrake rattlesnake. These two forms of this species are
different in their appearance and their life history.
The timber, or mountain form, can vary from a background color
of yellow to black, both with dark cross-bands across the back.
The canebrake, or coastal form typically has a background color
of light tan but can be pink to light orange, with dark cross-bands.
The canebrake form typically has a red-brown stripe running down
its back. This stripe is missing in the mountain form.
The timber rattlesnake of the mountains is typically associated
with south-facing rock outcrops, where snakes den communally
for the winter. The warm months find this form hunting along the
streams and valleys near the over-wintering site. The canebrake of
the piedmont and coastal plain is a species of forested woodlands,
wooded bluffs near rivers, river swamps and wet thickets.
Canebrake rattlesnakes, like their relative the diamondback,
tend to over-winter singly in stump-holes and other subterranean
structures.
Ambush predators, both forms feed primarily on rodents including
mice, rats, chipmunks and squirrels. Timber rattlesnakes in some
parts of their range display an interesting hunting technique, sitting
at the base of a tree with their head leaning against the trunk and
pointing upward, waiting on a squirrel to descend.


The Pygmy Rattlesnake
The pigmy rattlesnake is the miniature of the
rattlesnake world, with adults seldom reaching over a
foot in length. Background color can vary from dark,
charcoal gray to light gray and pink. Dark blotches
occur down the back of this rattlesnake and often a
faint red stripe runs down the spine. The pigmy has a tiny set of rattles that may be difficult to see without
close inspection and often cannot be heard.
Pigmy rattlesnakes are found throughout South
Carolina, with the exception of the mountains. They
occur in a variety of habitats but are seldom found
far from fresh water, such as marshes, swamps and
ponds. Pigmies feed on a variety of prey including
lizards, frogs and small rodents.


Coral Snake
The coral snake is South Carolina’s only representative of a group
of snakes known as elapids. This family of snakes contains some
of the world’s deadliest snakes including cobras, mambas and
the Australian snakes such as the taipan and tiger snake. Coral
snakes are not pit vipers, as are our other venomous snakes, and
are quite different both in appearance and behavior from these
snakes.
Adult coral snakes can reach a length of 2 feet. The bright red,
yellow and black bands alternate down the length of the body. Two
species of non-venomous snakes are similar in appearance to the coral snake. The banding patterns for the harmless scarlet snake
and scarlet kingsnake differ from those of the coral snake ... on the
coral snake the red and black bands never touch and the nose of
the coral snake is always black.
Coral snakes can occur in a wide range of habitats; however,
they are never found commonly anywhere. The species is very
secretive, spending much of its time underground, and loose,
sandy soil typifies most of the habitats frequented by the coral
snake. The coral snake feeds primarily on lizards and other snakes


The Water Moccasin or better known in these parts as the Cotton Mouth.
The cottonmouth, also known as the water moccasin, is a large snake of
wetlands and swamps. Adult cottonmouths are typically 3 to 4 feet in length
but can reach lengths in excess of 5 feet. The cottonmouth is variable in
coloration ranging from dark brown and black to olive drab and yellow-tan.
Dark cross-bands occur irregularly down the length of the body. Juvenile
cottonmouths resemble copperheads with their brighter, well-defined pattern.
Cottonmouths are almost always associated with some type of wetland. They
occur in riverine swamps and floodplains, lake edges, Carolina bays, and small stream forests. Cottonmouths eat a variety of prey including rodents,
amphibians, fish and other snakes.
Unlike other venomous snakes that generally attempt to escape from
humans, the cottonmouth will stand its ground. They typically coil tightly, with
the head centered in the coil and the mouth held open showing the white
“cotton” lining. Researchers believe this threat display is a warning, and
research results indicate that cottonmouths are reluctant to bite humans who
approach them.


The Copper Head.
The copperhead is South Carolina’s most common
venomous snake. Found throughout our state, the
copperhead can reach a length of 4 feet; however,
the average adult length is between 2 and 3 feet.
Background color varies from pink to coppery-tan with
dark brown hourglass-shaped cross-bands overlying.
The head is typically a uniform copper color.
Copperheads occur in a wide range of habitat types
including mountain coves, piedmont and coastal
plain hardwood forests, longleaf pine forests and
swamp forests. Copperheads feed on a variety of prey
including small rodents, frogs, lizards and insects.


My only advice is to know your snakes and watch where you stick your hand as well as where you step. These snake can and will bite and can not only be very painful BUT can kill you!
Fred :kiltdance:

:whistle: Hi I am Fred and I wear skirts and dresses all of the time. :hooray:
"It is better to be hated for what you are than be loved for what you are not"
Andre Gide: 1869 - 1951
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