Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

General discussion of skirt and kilt-based fashion for men, and stuff that goes with skirts and kilts.

Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby weeladdie18 » Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:41 am

It has been said that skirts for men will not become fashionable until men wear skirts...
We do our best but our numbers are very thin on the ground................
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Caultron » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:00 pm

Jetblasted wrote:I got caught a few times wearing my mom’s lingerie when I was a kid. Although I’ve never seen myself as a cross dresser, I’ve lost count the number of times I’ve worn panties in place of men’s underwear. I’ve never considered myself CD.

It's interesting how many men here like wearing skirts but resist even the slightest suggestion of leaning toward crossdressing. I suppose it depends on the rigidity or each person's definition of crossdressing. But i suppose a man wearing a skirt and presenting as such is different from a man trying to impersonate a woman.

Jetblasted wrote:I will admit a multiple decade jealousy of girls wearing cheerleadering skirts. I played football for 14 years, so they always had my eye.

Me too. Of course most guys like looking at girls wearing cheerleader skirts, but the leap from there to wanting to wear a cheerleader skirt is less common, and probably has a variety of reasons.

Jetblasted wrote:When I hit 50 I was determined to get a casual kilt for lounging around the house. Not finding anything I really liked in kilts, I told my wife I wanted
to cut two old gym shorts apart to make a “house-kilt” as I called it. She surprised me one day & did it for me. Further comments got her to scan a local thrift shop & she brought home two more skirts.

You're fortunate to have such a understanding and cooperative wife.

Jetblasted wrote:I’ve worn all four rotated daily for the past six years. My favorite is showing its age, and will have to be replaced, soon.

Six years is 2190 days, so 438 days per skirt? Surely all four started showing their age some time ago, eh? Or am I missing something?

Jetblasted wrote: Growing acceptance with my new self I started shaving my legs, and have been daily for over three years now. Currently I drink Spearmint Tea daily, which helps limit body hair growth. I’m going to order a home LumaRx Pro IPL Hair remover in three weeks for a Christmas present to myself. While I do not consider myself transgender, I am very happy to be in the middle. I spent years as a mountain man in the North Georgia Appalachian Mountains, with a duck dynasty beard
to boot, but I much much prefer the softer side of things. I still love my shotgun & chainsaw, but I love my skirted & shaved legs more.

Still no leanings at all toward crossdressing or transsexualism, eh? But OK, I believe you.
Courage, conviction, nerve, verve, dash, panache, guts, nuts, balls, gall, élan, stones, whatever. Get some and get skirted.

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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Caultron » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:14 pm

Happy-N-Skirts wrote:...I wear my "masculine" skirts in public quite a bit and am rarely noticed...Over the years I have met a few men wearing kilts and wished I had their guts and envied them...I wish it would be socially acceptable for men and boys to wear skirts.

In my case, at least, wearing a skirt in public is much more daring than wearing a kilt. I wore only utility kilts in public for about two years before I dared venture forth in a skirt. So how do you find wearing a kilt as gutsier than wearing a skirt?

I think it's already socially acceptable for men and boys to wear skirts in public. The fact that you're only rarely noticed attests to that. But it would be less edgy if more men and boys did it.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Jetblasted » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:36 pm

I’ve got four skirts. Two were converted from gym shorts.
And they were purchased around about 2004. I wear them
daily in the summer. However, they spent most of their life
in a chest of drawers until I started wearing skirts about
5-6 years ago. The next two are proper skirts. Both knee
length. One is sort of a heavy polyester, wrap-around type.
I wear it mainly in the winter. It’s extremely rare for me to
ditch it in favor of flannel pajamas. It will have to be
extremely cold for me to do so. The other is worn the majority
of the rest of the time. It’s an A-Libe of sorts. Small elastic
band, majority cotton blend. It’s extremely comfortable. That’s
the one that is showing its age. Three of the four are black.
One of the gym skirts is gray.

Now, I’m unsure about the status of many on this board. I’ve
always taken it to be a manly thing for most of you. I myself
view myself as a regular guy. I like hunting, vegetable gardening,
drinking beer & college football. I’m a huge civil war buff, and
I hate Communists. But, I have seen this board described
elsewhere online as a haven for sissies. While I have had my
sissy moments in the past, I don’t view myself as one.

I mention this, because I was unaware that our sexual leanings
were of discussion here. However if you really must know,
I practice NBE, or, Natural Breast Enlargement. I take a low-dose
of the herb, Pueraria Mirifica, and I have obtained a nice B-Cup n

I do not consider myself transgender. I consider myself a man,
with boobs. I dress male in public. I wear a tie to work five days
a week. if I have to go out in public, I wear my overalls in fall and
winter. I wear shorts in spring & summer.

I have recently switched to low-dose Bovine Ovary, and to be
honest, I much prefer it over PM, for a myriad of reasons. While
it is giving me a slightly feminine figure, the most obvious is
myboobs. At my age, HRT looks like a train wreck on men, and
I still much prefer keeping male function. My wife has needs, too.

So I apologize if this comes off as snarky, but I wasn’t expecting
the personal questions regarding my sexual leanings. I’ve never
brought it up, as I didn’t thing this was that kind of forum.

However, I am more of a lurker, than a poster. I see many of the
same names, and several new ones, so that in itself is a good thing.

This hobby of ours is rather unique. Dead forums suck.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Jetblasted » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:55 pm

If anyone wants to venture over and check out what we’re doing with NBE, most of the UK posters can be found on
breastnexum ... while ainterol herbs forum is the other popular site. I go by Stevenator on both sites.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby moonshadow » Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:28 am

Jetblasted wrote:...I have seen this board described
elsewhere online as a haven for sissies.


Its' not. I know there are some members here with some odd kinks, but for the most part, this site stays pretty clean of that noise.

As for this old boy *points to self*, I ain't doing nothing to my body that I can't remove or wash off at the end of the day. I figure if I was meant to have additional holes in my head, boobs, or increased amounts of estrogen, I'd have been born that way. Don't let my femme clothes fool ya... it's just fabric.

Not that I'm bringing judgement on anyone here who gets into this type of thing, but as for me... homey don't play that...
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby KellyRain » Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:49 am

I was goth when I was young. Still at 54 there are lingering aspects. Being different is something I have always been rather used to. But a guy in a skirt in my home town in Utah would invite violence. Even being alternative resulted in attacks more often that I care to remember.

For me a skirt was always just a piece of clothing. When I moved to Seattle I often saw guys in skirts in the goth scene but rarely for other straight men. But I always thought I could look good in one, but never had courage to try. I just love fashion and thought it would be a nice alternative. My fashion had always been fairly gender neutral though leaning quite a bit towards male. But still I was too shy to try a skirt other than a rare time out at a gothic club where it was 100% safe.

So about two years ago I fell in love with Yohji Yamamoto fashion and that got the skirt back in mind. So I decided to give it a try. And now three months in I have several kilts, a couple designer men's skirts and some skirt like pants. I have worn kilts out a few times now, though all black or grey until yesterday's red tartan.

Now I am inspired to inspire other men here to try. Japanese young men are already out there pioneering skirts for men in Japan. Though it is unlikely it will go too far into the mainstream in conformist Japan. But on the fringes they are here to stay.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby moonshadow » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:23 pm

KellyRain wrote:But a guy in a skirt in my home town in Utah would invite violence. Even being alternative resulted in attacks more often that I care to remember.


Perhaps at one time, but I'd bet that things have cooled off a little now, and you may be surprised by the lack of reaction you'd get should you attempt to wear a skirt even in a place like Utah. I remember going into the deep south once with a short skirt on and being somewhat timid about it. Only to find out that, pretty much like everywhere else, nobody really cared. Glances and a few stares? Of course, but then again, how often do you see a man wearing a skirt anyway? That's sure to draw a few eyes your way.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Jetblasted » Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:01 am

Jetblasted wrote:
...I have seen this board described
elsewhere online as a haven for sissies.

Moon ... I never said I thought this is a sissy site.
I saw someone, on some online forum, a sub-reddit
I think, said this was a sissy hang out.

I wear skirts. I wear bras & panties, too. I wear a men’s
tie at work. I wear overalls most of the time in town
on errands. At home & in the yard, you can always find
me in a skirt. 365 days a year.

If I’m a sissy, then so be-it. My wife still loves me. Ha!
She likes my growing bust-line, too. We’re a good fit.
What works for me is all I care about. Me & her have
got it good right now. We’re closer than ever.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Caultron » Mon Dec 17, 2018 5:17 pm

Jetblasted wrote:...If I’m a sissy, then so be-it. My wife still loves me...

My wife has called me that a couple of times but I just glare at her and let it go.

Anyway, to me, the term refers to young girlhood regression and/or submissiveness, and I'm not into either of those.

Jetblasted wrote:...She likes my growing bust-line, too. We’re a good fit...

Very briefly, are you on HRT, then? If so,what are you taking and is it obvious in public yet?
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Jetblasted » Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:05 am

I don’t mean to side-track this thread. I love my skirts.
One day I might work up the nerve to buy a kilt. They’re
just so bulky, that I don’t think I’d find them comfortable.
But, I’m not on HRT. That makes us older guys look like a
train wreck, and you lose all male function. My wife would
ring my neck if that ever happened. HaHa. But I’m using
Herbs for my Natural Breast Enlargement. It’s a multi year
quest, I can tel you that! They’re to the point of being
obviously noticeable now, where I’ll have to order a binder
for my upcoming trip home to my parents. I don’t hide them
locally, but tbh, no one ever notices. I don’t wear a skirt to
town on errands, but I do wear shorts & no one looks at my
shaved legs, either.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Caultron » Wed Dec 19, 2018 6:27 am

Jetblasted wrote:...I love my skirts. One day I might work up the nerve to buy a kilt...

I thought for years about wearing a utility kilt, which seemed the most masculine of skirts, but never found the nerve.

Then I overcame that and thought for several years about wearing a skirt designed for women but again lacked the nerve.

Then I overcame that but seized up on the idea of wearing tights or pantyhose designed for women.

Then I overcame that but couldn't bring myself to wear heels in public.

That too I overcame but then I choked at the idea of wearing a noticable padded bra in public.

Now I'm thinking about not needing the padding.

Along the way, no real negativity. Surprise and a few glares, yes, but no real negativity. Just keep smiling and wish people a nice day. You're just an OK guy doing his own thing. Enjoy!

Hmmm.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Sinned » Thu Dec 20, 2018 5:19 pm

Just to change the subject a little. I went to the Doctor's surgery with MOH as she had an appointment. Whilst in the waiting room I picked up a copy of the magazine Prima and in it was an article entitled, "A confident you starts today" by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman.

1. Drop the charade
Do this:
Don't pretend to be anything or anyone.
Why?
"We've been told that "fake it till you make it" is the best way to get more confidence, but it's not as effective as we thought," says Katty. "Confidence isn't about
pretending or putting on an act. In fact faking it can make us feel less secure because knowingly masquerading as something we're not makes us pretend to be
anything or anyone. Instead, do one small brave thing, then the next one will be easier - and soon confidence will effortlessly flow."
Start by:
.... trying a micro challenge. It could be small, like whipping up tricky pastries you saw on Bake Off, but you'll be amazed at how mastering little things gives
you the confidence to achieve bigger feats.

2. Leave your comfort zone
Do this:
Embrace the risk of possible failure .
Why?
You learn by your mistakes. Doing what you know and have always done is safe, but it's the enemy of confidence. "You won't experience how far you can go
without pushing yourself," explains Katty. "Gaining confidence means experiencing setbacks and, with determination, picking yourself back up. Doing risky things
keeps you growing and gaining confidence. In contrast, staying in your comfort zone brings you little."
Start by:
.... doing more day-to-day things you wouldn't normally expect of yourself ( you don't have to do anything radical like jump out of a plane, unless you want to ).
For example, if you turn down party invites when you worry you won't know people, go and pass around the food, introducing yourself. Once you realise risky
things aren't as bad as they seem ( and neither is failure ), you'll feel brave enough to leave your comfort zone for good.

3.Ditch negative thoughts
Do this:
Focus on the positive.
Why?
According to research by Yale University, a woman's brain is not always her friend when it comes to confidence. And a man's is? RSO's
Studies found that women have an instinct to dwell on problems rather than solutions, and to spin on why they did a certain thing, how well or how poorly they did,
and what every one else thought. "Negative thoughts buzz around more than positive thoughts, and can multiply at lightning speed, says Katty.
Start by:
....jotting down negative thinking in a journal for a few days. "Don't beat yourself up about these thoughts - that simply leads to more anxiety, Katty says.
"Instead, look for an alternative point of view that will re-frame your focus." For instance, "Did I put myself forward for something I shouldn't have?" becomes "I
wanted to do it, that's why it's worth pursuing." Your second thought doesn't have to prove the first wrong, but create an explanation to lessen the potency of the
first. Another tip is is to spend time thinking positively. Every day, remind yourself of three things you did right. "Positive thoughts literally rewire the brain and
break the negative feedback loop. This can produce a change in thoughts, then actions, in weeks."

4. Champion yourself
Do this:
Instead of staying quiet, flag up your achievements.
Why?
Often women seem to have the spotlight thing backwards. "We shine a bright light on our faults, insecurities, and the reasons we will surely fail but, when it comes
to taking credit or enjoying our triumphs, we step into the shadows," says Katty. "Developing a sense of our own self-deserved value and hearing yourself recognise
your accomplishments bolsters confidence."
Start by:
.... finding ways to take in compliments and own your achievements. It needn't be complicated - or feel boastful. Even a simple "thank you, I appreciate that" can
make you feel surprisingly lifted.

5. Stop worrying about others
Do this:
Try not to take things to heart. Remember, it's not personal.
Why?
"It's all too easy to think that whatever you've done - whether it's a triumph or a failure - is the focus of everyone's attention," says Katty. "It isn't. Most people are
too busy getting on with their own lives to worry about what you're up to. Thinking this way kills confidence."
Start by:
.... remembering that if something doesn't go your way, it's not a personal attack, it's just a result of circumstances - and it doesn't mean you'll never be successful.
So, if you don't get the job you wanted, don't think, "He must have thought I was an idiot when I said I couldn't use Excel," think, "I gained valuable experience from
that interview and now I know what skills I nee to develop." By counteracting thoughts with facts - that you have lots of valuable qualities that employers want,
which is why you were interviewed and that you need to find the right job for you - you'll be free to take positive steps forward.

OK, a bit simplistic in places so please, no in depth analysis, it is from Prima mag after all and remind yourself of the target audience, but it does add emphasis to what we have been saying on this site all along about confidence and not giving a sh*t about what other people think. The bit in blue test is my own comment. Hope you enjoy it and if my layout of the text is screwed up on the device you are using to access this site then, tuff.
I believe in offering every assistance short of actual help but then mainly just want to be left to be myself in all my difference and uniqueness.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby Keystone » Thu Dec 20, 2018 8:55 pm

This is a great question and it strikes home every moment I want to wear a skirt. I always ask myself, "why am I wanting to wear a skirt all the time and when did it start?" When I was in the first grade (1973), all the girls wore dresses to (public) school. When it was time for recess on rainy days, the boys were warned by the (female) teacher not to get their pants muddy. "Stay on the macadam. If you get your pants muddy, I'll make you wear a dress!" I remember thinking to myself, "that would be great!" However, as an intimidated first grader, I didn't go for it. Looking back, it would have been interesting to call her bluff. A couple of times growing up my sister would loan me an undershirt as mine were all in the wash. Her undershirts had a tiny rose stitched in the front of the collar it when I wore it I was reminded that I was wearing girl's clothing. Also while in elementary school, my father took a trip to Greece and brought back statue of a Greek honor guard soldier wearing their classical Fustanella, (skirt-like) uniform. I remember saying to myself, "that would be great to wear a skirt and that's an honor guard soldier!" In the 8th grade I eventually toured Greece with my parents and saw the Greek hornor guard first hand. I attempted to find a souvenir shop that sold a copy of the uniform but had no such luck. It wouldn't have mattered any way, my parents would not allowed me to purchase something like that. My brother visited the island of Somoa and brought me back a Lava Lava. I wrapped it briefly over my shorts to see how it fit but it struck more as a towel. I have plenty of towels in the linen closet so I wasn't interested and put it away. My interest in wearing a skirt went dormant as the notion of a man going into mall stores to buy a skirt was inconeivable. I figured I needed to accept that wearing t-shirts and jeans, khaki pants, polo and dress shirts would be my life. For years, I worked retail clothing and was always envious of the style options avilable to women. Their clothing always looked fun and exciting. I always thought I wish I had those choices. It would be fun to try. Shortly after college the Internet came into existence and with it cyber-shopping and my thoughts began to be tempted with the idea of buying a skirt online. For our hoonymoon my wife and I went to Scotland (aka God's country). We rented a car and drove around for two weeks. I think twice in two weeks we see a person wearing a kilt but only two the entire trip. I figured the musician at the Edinburgh Castle walking across the parade deck didn't count. The other instance was an older teenager that came into a restaurant/bar to shoot pool. His friend asked "why are you wearing a kilt?" to which he replied "I just got back from a wedding." With that I got the impression the kilt-wearing in the land of kilts was only for special family events, church festivals, and the Royal Tattoo. I went to the store Scotland by the Mile (on the Royal Mile, I think) to price out a kilt as my family actually has a tartan. I already have a tarten tie and scarf and I figured it would be nice to have the full get-up. However, my new wife immediately poo poo-ed the idea on the notion that I wouln't have an event to wear it and they were expensive. So I pretty much gave up of kilts. I stumbled on the topic of Men in Skirts in Quora. There I found posts by other heterosexual, cisgender men that were sharing their interests in wearing skirts. I also found images on Pinterest and this rekindled my interest. Someone's post mentioned SkirtCafe so I searched and signed-up. Then about a years ago I saw a man in the supermarket wearing a pleated skirt with his girl friend. He looked pretty rough (like 20 miles of bad road) but he was out there sporting his skirt to which I give him credit. I ran into another guy at the local brew pub wearing a kilt and we struck up a pleasent conversation. I then ran into him at the supermarket a month later. I found the three local sightings in the middle of no-where PA to be very encouraging and gave me a sense of hope that perhaps it was catching on. However, judging by other people's SkirtCafe posts, these encounters are very rare (Halley's Comet rare). On SkirtCafe and Quora I was surprised to read how easy and accepting it was to buy a skirt in stores stores and that staff was actually helpful. I had visions of a sales women yelling "MASHER" while beating me over the head with a broom telling me to get out. However, after years of working retail clothing and watching one women after another women buy men's jeans, why shouldn't men beable to buy skirts? Anyway, after reading encouraging posts from SkirtCafe, I went into a couple of stores and bought some skirts. They were big box stores and there was no sales help save the changing room attendants. I also bought some online. I never had to shop for men's clothes. I knew my size and would go into a store, pick up the item and make my purchase. There was never any reason to try things on when you know how a brand fits. However, I'll spend hours shopping online for a skirt. The choices of styles make it so much fun. I look at a skirt and imagine myself wearing the item.
I don't know why I'm so addicted to skirts, I wish I knew. There's something about them that make them fun and exciting to buy and wear. There isn't anything men's clothing that comes close. Skirt shopping and reading posts in SkirtCafe encouraged me be more bold with my skirt-wearing in public. Thanks to all for your encouraging stories.
Last edited by Keystone on Fri Dec 21, 2018 5:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Where did you first get the idea to wear a skirt?

Postby crfriend » Fri Dec 21, 2018 1:58 am

Sinned wrote:Just to change the subject a little. I went to the Doctor's surgery with MOH as she had an appointment. Whilst in the waiting room I picked up a copy of the magazine Prima and in it was an article entitled, "A confident you starts today" by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman.

There is much wisdom in there -- and it's not just for women as the article was clearly written for -- but for all of humanity. In reading through it, I caught not only glimpses of myself, but also of my late ex. There is much resonance.

I'll try to hit a few high points, and I'm sure that there are folks who can either debunk my assertions or amplify them.
1. Drop the charade

I'd thought that "Fake it until you make it" had already been well and truly debunked, but here it is surfacing again in the closing years of the second decade of the 21st Century. I first read about that in the 1980s and recoiled in horror.

First and foremost, trying to be something that you aren't simply doesn't work unless you're an Academy Award winner (and even then sometimes not). Be who you are; it's the only part you'll ever play well in your life. Everything else is fallacy.

I still recall my late ex's comment regarding when she was still "faking it" after struggling mightily with a computer program finally asking for advice and her boss saying matter-of-factly, "Shouldn't that be logical shift combined?" when he glanced at her code. She carried that to the bitter end. Don't fake things. If you need tools, acquire them or develop them.
2. Leave your comfort zone

This is very definitely useful advice -- and it's useful advice in many arenas. For instance, the phenomenon is explicitly mentioned in Henry Petrosky's wonderful book, To Engineer is Human. In that short volume, he asserts that progress has never come from complacency and doing things "the way we've always done them". Sure, sometimes when somebody tries something daring he fails; this is the sad of life -- and we learn vastly more from failure than we do from repeated success. Think outside the box once in a while.
3.Ditch negative thoughts

Also ditch the notion of "the power of positive thinking" -- think in terms of Zen. Do not waste energy on things that you cannot change. This includes much of what's happened in the past unless there's a realistic chance of offering amends to someone. Dwelling on the negative saps one's energy needlessly. Let it go. Focus your energy budget on things you can affect change in.
4. Champion yourself

I'm not so sure on this one, but am always willing to be proved wrong. "Tooting one's own horn" has never been regarded as an attribute for guys. Perhaps the gals still need to do it, but it sounds a bit self-serving to this old-school guy.
5. Stop worrying about others

See my comment about Zen above. If you can't change it, dismiss it as best you can and don't waste energy on it.

Hilariously, and I'd never considered it, when I was in the depths of The Unravelling of 2015 I never even considered Zen until I was chatting with an old friend one day over lunch how I was dealing with matters (he asked) and I outlined the tactics I was using to try to stay sane and alive -- and it was he that pointed out that I was using Zen in the matter without even knowing it. (I'd never studied it, and all I was trying to do at the time was stay alive and sane in the face of several simultaneous existential threats).

So, yes, the article brought up good points, from a women-centric viewpoint, but is valid (for everybody) and can be adapted for anybody.

One amplification I'd make to the article is that complacency leads to a gradual erosion of capability -- hence the need to continually push the boundaries. It's trivially easy to get "stuck in a rut", and before long the walls of that rut will start to close in. They'll close in imperceptibly at first, and then it'll speed up, at which time you'll find yourself buried. Push the boundaries. Push not only your own for your own survival, but also those of society's. Both need it.
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