Common Terminology

General discussion of skirt and kilt-based fashion for men, and stuff that goes with skirts and kilts.

Re: Common Terminology

Postby denimini » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:32 am

Kirbstone wrote:Was that what you guys had in mind?


Mounting that step would test any tight skirt, if there wasn't a split beforehand ...........
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Sinned » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:47 pm

True Anthony. The awkwardness of the woman's step up shows why I just don't like tight skirts, be it pencil or tighter. I like the wide hem so that my stride is uninhibited, hence the A-line or skater skirts.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Happy-N-Skirts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:02 pm

I read an article about female military uniforms about how the skirts didn't allow much motion and was impossible to run while wearing one. It appears that whoever designed them had modesty in mind without practicality. I don't know whether they changed or improved on the design.

I would prefer wearing an A line, skater, or circle skirt, however I wear stealth skirts that are disguised to look as close as possible like I am wearing shorts. I try to achieve the optimum of freedom of stride, while not being "discovered" wearing a skirt. I feel like I am getting away with something. I often forget what I am wearing and just go about my day. I have never been caught or embarrassed in a skirt. I have them shortened to above the knee similar to my shorts. We live in a resort area where most men wear shorts all year.

I think some entrepreneurs need to produce stealth skirts and show active men playing golf, hiking, gardening, wearing skirts while women are admiring them. That's how the revolution will start.
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Re: Happy-N-Skirts

Postby Grok » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:43 pm

So, do you order "stealth skirts" from athenagarments.com?
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby skirtyscot » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:56 pm

Happy-N-Skirts wrote:I think some entrepreneurs need to produce stealth skirts and show active men playing golf, hiking, gardening, wearing skirts while women are admiring them. That's how the revolution will start.


You could well be right, HNS. What do you mean by a stealth skirt? To me, the phrase suggests a single box pleat front and back, to give the impression of the legs of shorts. I can see how that could be a relatively easy style to get men to buy.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Happy-N-Skirts » Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:09 pm

I have various stealthy skirts. Denim are stealthy but heavy and I prefer lighter weight fabric. I have some scrub skirts that I have had shortened. They are pull on elastic waist and have large pockets. I usually don't carry anything in my pockets because it causes the skirt to droop. Scrub skirts are soft, comfortable, and very low cost. They have just the right amount of flare to resemble shorts. I have them shortened to above the knees. There is enough fabric left over to make another skirt. They come in several colors. I prefer darker colors.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Grok » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:46 am

skirtyscot wrote:
Happy-N-Skirts wrote:I think some entrepreneurs need to produce stealth skirts and show active men playing golf, hiking, gardening, wearing skirts while women are admiring them. That's how the revolution will start.


You could well be right, HNS. What do you mean by a stealth skirt? To me, the phrase suggests a single box pleat front and back, to give the impression of the legs of shorts. I can see how that could be a relatively easy style to get men to buy.
This was my guess as well. With features one would associate with shorts, such as belt loops and pockets.

If I recall correctly, somebody mentioned something similar in the sewing section.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Kilted_John » Mon Jan 22, 2018 4:27 am

Grok wrote:[This was my guess as well. With features one would associate with shorts, such as belt loops and pockets.

If I recall correctly, somebody mentioned something similar in the sewing section.


Might've been this?

http://www.burdastyle.com/projects/purp ... rted-pleat
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Daryl » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:30 am

Grok wrote:
Daryl wrote:
The idea that their point was to show the contrast between hips and legs is certainly well founded, since bodily contrasts has been an aim of women's fashions for a long long time. A pencil skirt as we know it generally tapers towards the bottom and is not straight like a real pencil would be. Even with a kick pleat a longish pencil can be quite restrictive but it just looks so darned sharp and is so comfortable and convenient to wear it is worth that slight sacrifice IMO.
I was looking at comments online which described the difference between pencil and straight. A straight skirt lacks the taper of a pencil skirt. A straight skirt goes straight down, giving it a somewhat looser fit than a pencil skirt-and permitting normal walking.
BTW, there is a style called a "peg skirt", which has even more of a taper than a pencil skirt.


Yeah, that taper is definitive nowadays though the skirt's namesake, the pencil, never tapers (as pens often do) so I think it is an acquired, not original definition. The original intent of the name "pencil" was probably just to indicate long and narrow, not tapered. Where the skirt (the paint on the pencil) ended the legs would begin (representing the wood of the pencil) and getting narrower finally ending at the dark graphite tip of the pencil (the shoes).
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Daryl » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:41 am

skirtyscot wrote:On the right body, pencil skirts look terrific. A colleague of mine a few years ago was maybe a little curvier than the ideal. Not huge but generally rounded. (Is this what they call an apple shape?) She bought a pencil skirt and the effect was remarkable. Somehow it took a feature which was not terribly attractive, her backside, and by emphasising it made it look stunning. Alchemy, pure alchemy.

Not one for us gents to try.


Indeed, at least not men of substantial heft such as myself. The skirts I make and wear and call pencils are designed for my shape or the general masculine shape (they could be scaled to suit smaller guys) and make no attempt to emulate female curves (rather, they cover male lumps;).

So, I think in the matter of definitions, a "mens pencil skirt" would not attempt to reproduce the womens pencil skirt but rather work with the masculine shape just as womens pencil skirts work with the feminine shape. Some tapering inwards towards the hem could be in order but little or no rounding around the hips and butt.

That said, I own a womens pencil skirt that is not so violently curved that it looks totally wrong on me, but it does look better if I wear a top that goes over the top of the skirt rather than being tucked into it, creating a straighter silhouette. Turtleneck sweaters accomplish this well.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Grok » Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:50 am

Yes, Kilted_John, I think the link illustrates the basic concept. Though from what I can see, this particular garment isn't convincing as shorts-it looks like a skirt that happens to have a pleat in the middle.
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