New terminology related to MUG wearing?

General discussion of skirt and kilt-based fashion for men, and stuff that goes with skirts and kilts.

Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Grok » Thu Feb 20, 2014 10:45 pm

How to increase demand? Well, are there any potential markets that are not being tapped?
Last edited by Grok on Fri Feb 21, 2014 9:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Caultron » Thu Feb 20, 2014 10:51 pm

Grok wrote:For number 1 I meant traditional Male Unbifurcated Garments (MUGs). As in importing MUGs from nonWestern societies.

We have that, with utility kilts imported from India costing as little as $50. But even with domestic suppliers importing these, you have to order "blind" over the internet.

Grok wrote:other than these examples, I think that the most likely future is that of DIY projects, or possibly hiring a seamstress to make a custom garment.

Neither of those sseems likely to create a mass market.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby couyalair » Fri Feb 21, 2014 11:43 am

Caultron wrote:Whatever keeps men from buying in the ladies department today will probably remain in force. I suppose you could swap out the size labels and tags, and not sell the same item in both departments in the same store, though.


I can understand your first sentence there (men are just too shy!), but can not see why each dept should not have some identical items. I think it would be quite acceptable -- in fact, advisable -- to have a third dept, midway between the men's and the women's, to display items that can be worn by either sex, ie jeans, plain skirts, some shirts ... It would make these things more accessible to the shy sex who would no longer have to venture into the dreaded feminine section of the shop.

Martin , who has to admit to being too self conscious to go hunting in the women,s section except in my local charity shop where there is no clear boundary.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Sinned » Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:43 pm

I have advocated doing away with the men's and women's departments completely. There is quite a large section of clothing that can already be worn by either sex and a substantial portion that appear as women's but with encouragement could be worn by men - tops, t-shirts, shirt dresses, jeans, woollens etc. There's only actually a very small proportion that is exclusively women's or men's. I doubt that there's a retailer that has the courage to do so though. This goes even for children's clothes which generally don't have separate boy's and girl's sections.
I believe in offering every assistance short of actual help but then mainly just want to be left to be myself in all my difference and uniqueness.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Caultron » Fri Feb 21, 2014 4:23 pm

couyalair wrote:I think it would be quite acceptable -- in fact, advisable -- to have a third dept, midway between the men's and the women's, to display items that can be worn by either sex, ie jeans, plain skirts, some shirts ... It would make these things more accessible to the shy sex who would no longer have to venture into the dreaded feminine section of the shop.

Aside from the skirt vs. trousers issue, the cut and styles in men's and women's department are generally different. Even in near-identical items, women's pockets and belt loops are generally smaller, and men's larger.

Also, most men would probably avoid buying, say, a size 16 while most women would avoid buying a 34-36 waist.

But I suppose that, like anything else, could change over time. Somewhere I have a link to a unisex clothing shop operating in the Far East.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Grok » Fri Feb 21, 2014 4:50 pm

Caultron wrote:
Grok wrote:
Grok wrote:other than these examples, I think that the most likely future is that of DIY projects, or possibly hiring a seamstress to make a custom garment.

Neither of those sseems likely to create a mass market.


Certainly not create a mass market. But such projects allow members to please themselves in the present. And conceivably create an item that might inspire others.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Grok » Thu Feb 27, 2014 4:10 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skort. Article indicates that skorts are also referred to as "scants" or "scooters."
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby r.m.anderson » Thu Feb 27, 2014 5:27 am

Regarding SKORTS I have several and am an avid wearer of same.
If you go on Ebay you will find somewhere in the vicinity of 50k of
these skirt modified clothing articles. Certainly not all fit - like the
dreaded pants and other clothing items they are sized. In most
cases you can wear a shorter skirt when you have the built in panties;
spankies; compression shorts and aka underwear underneath.
Most of those that I have are 12-14 inch hem length. None of the
skorts I have have pockets so I wear a custom fanny-bum bag for
all my worldly goodies (Drivers license-Credit Card(s)-swiss army
pocket knife-car keys and cell phone). For those not quite in the know
skorts are nothing more than short shorts with an apron covering
going around at least the front of the garment. Originally designed
for children and called scooters with apron up front and looking like
shorts from the back side. In recent years women have worn them
as a fashion statement for a wide range of athletic activities primary
golf and tennis but also in lacrosse(field hockey) substituting for the
traditional kilt/skirt. While the skort is just a tad more expensive than
a skirt basically the color schemes and typical "A" frame skirt structure
are hard to define or notice any differences between the two.

As a clothing item to be worn by men well questions persist just like
wearing a skirt or dress. It is easier to pass off if the the main color
theme is a tartan pattern (looks like a mini-kilt) or a darker color.
To the casual eye a quick glance and it appears to be out of place
depending on the angle of view.
If made of denim material it is more in likely to past muster because
denim is so forgiving. Wearing bright colors with color block outlining
will certainly stand out from the norm.
But if you are man enough to wear a skirt with the same similar color
combinations a skort will not be much different.
You of course will not find them in or near the men's section unless the
aisle separating the sexes is so narrow it is unavoidable as is with athletic
sporting goods stores.

The skort is primarily sized or fitted for the Misses (think even numbers 0-14
or the traditional S - M - L - XL lettering).
The skort is normally worn as a pull-on short with an elastic waist band.
There are fitted designs with zipper and button closing and even some real
neat kilt applications with the wrap skirt apron.

There are purists that condemn the skort for having the under accouterments
that a skirt does not have. Why would you wear a bifurcated short under a
unbifurcated skirt ? Well to each his own and the devil for us all !
You wear what you like and I will wear what I like and if you wear a skirt
with the same hem line as a skort you are most apt to have some trouble keeping
things out of the way and controlled in an exciting event ! LOL
Can be worn with a "T" shirt; blouse or polo shirt for the top and with or without
sox - sneakers or sandals footwear. You are good to go !

In the long or the short of it I like skorts in lieu of skirts especially short ones !

Attachment/Photo of one of my favorites a pleated tennis skort - - -
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
"Kilt-On" -or- as the case may be "Skirt-On" !
WHY ?
Isn't wearing a kilt enough?
Well a skirt will do in a pinch!
Make mine short and don't you dare think of pinching there !
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby skirtingtheissue » Mon May 05, 2014 12:44 pm

crfriend wrote:Very strictly speaking, English is a non-gendered language, quite unlike, say, French which confines certain words into "masculine" and "feminine" (e.g. "chat" (cat) is feminine and "chien" (dog) is masculine), so fundamentally there is no connotation one way or the other.
Aren't "chat" and "chien" both masculine, and to specify a particular one as female the words are "chatte" and "chienne"?
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby crfriend » Mon May 05, 2014 9:11 pm

skirtingtheissue wrote:Aren't "chat" and "chien" both masculine, and to specify a particular one as female the words are "chatte" and "chienne"?

My recollection of the time I spent learning French 35+ years ago is that "chat" (the generic term for "cat") is feminine and "chien" (dog) is masculine, hence the use of different introducing words, "le" for "chat" and "la" for "chien". In practice, the language most probably has distinguishing words for the two sexes of both species in the same vein as English has "tomcat" and "queen" for male and female cats (respectively), and "dog" and "*****" for canines (again, male and female, respectively).

I used French as an example of a "strongly typed" language because it's the one I know best. I know that German introduces an explicit neuter in addition to masculine and feminine, but I'm not sure how it works being ignorant of the grammar. English is non-gendered which is one of the reasons I tend to bristle about the "invention" of new words to describe something that already exists -- like the perfectly good and useful word "skirt"; if somebody is so wrapped up in the notion that the word would "label them for life" what else keeps them awake at night?
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby skirtingtheissue » Tue May 06, 2014 3:44 am

crfriend wrote:
skirtingtheissue wrote:Aren't "chat" and "chien" both masculine, and to specify a particular one as female the words are "chatte" and "chienne"?

My recollection of the time I spent learning French 35+ years ago is that "chat" (the generic term for "cat") is feminine and "chien" (dog) is masculine, hence the use of different introducing words, "le" for "chat" and "la" for "chien".
Try translate.google.com "the cat and the dog" and then "the female cat and the female dog". When I took French I was amused that "frog" was feminine and "toad" was masculine!

crfriend wrote: I tend to bristle about the "invention" of new words to describe something that already exists -- like the perfectly good and useful word "skirt";
I agree; for me it's fun to use the word "skirt" in the same way it's fun to wear one.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby skirtilator » Wed May 07, 2014 3:47 pm

Kiltologists, freestyler and traditional kiltist. The kiltologist is someone who cannot pretend enough that a kilt wasn't a skirt and that it is important that people understand the "difference" to not confuse it with a skirt. :shock: Unfortunately, some people are stubborn and don't buy into it. It comes with the terretory. :cry: Therefore he has to make a choice, being genuine and honest to himself or wear clothing for someone else, anything else would be a half measure.

A freestyler is either a fallen kiltologist or a person who allways lived up to his own standard and looked upon clothing for what it is. :D

Unlike the kiltologist, the traditional kiltist is all into scottish traditional kilt wearing. He fully embraces the kilt as part of a national dress. Outside of special occasions he feels out of place by wearing a kilt. He is a normal lad who puts on a "skirt" now and then if the tradition demands it. By not perceiving it as a skirt, he tricks himself into wearing it. :wink:
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Grok » Mon Sep 11, 2017 3:44 pm

Below Decks-below the waist.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby Gusto10 » Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:40 pm

OK some French: dog=> le Chat (m), La Chatte (f), Cat => le chien(m), la chienne (f), frog => la Grenouille, toad => le crapaud (m). The "cuisses des grenouilles" are a delicacie.
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Re: New terminology related to MUG wearing?

Postby beachlion » Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:44 pm

Gusto10 wrote:OK some French: dog=> le Chat (m), La Chatte (f), Cat => le chien(m), la chienne (f), frog => la Grenouille, toad => le crapaud (m). The "cuisses des grenouilles" are a delicacie.


You better check your dictionnaire => dictionary. :wink:
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