Adding a lining to a skirt

For those do-it-yourselfers...
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Coder
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Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Coder »

I was all set to post a step-by-step walkthrough of how I added a lining to an unlined skirt, but did not take intermediate pictures (not sure what I was thinking). I also don't have enough lining fabric left over to fake some, so I'll just describe the process and post some after pics. If anyone wants clarification, let me know.

For starters, I was going to follow these instructions:

https://mmmcrafts.blogspot.com/2010/03/ ... g.html?m=1

However, the skirt I have is an a-line with a slight curve to the outer shape when folded flat, so having a straight tube didn't make a lot of sense. I ended up doing the following:

1) Turned the skirt inside out
2) Cut two rectangles from my lining material, making sure they overlapped on the sides by 3 inches, and the top and bottom by 1"
3) Made a stack of the three items - first the lining, then the skirt, then the second piece of lining
4) I pinned the lining together on both sides of the skirt, making sure to get as close to the sides as possible without pinning the skirt
5) Carefully slid the lining off, and sewed both sides with a straight stitch along the pins
6) Hand stitched the lining to the waistband - fold a hem in the lining, and depending on the waistband style either stitch all the way through or stitch to the inside of the waistband

Image

7) Cut a slit along the length of the zipper, and hem the lining to the zipper fabric (see above pic)
8) At the bottom, pin along the length and test fit to make sure the lining is about 1"-1/2" above the skirt's hem, pin, and stitch (I used a machine) about 1/4" from the edge, as well as 1" from the edge. Trim excess.

Image

At this point you could stitch it to the bottom of the skirt, but based on how this one was constructed my thread would have shown so I left it loose. You can also add threads to keep the lining held to the bottom of the skirt, it didn't seem worth the effort.

All in all this is not the BEST piece of sewing work I've ever done, and I feel like I butchered the lining fabric, but it works and no one will see it except me, unless I sit down wrong.

Image
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Jim
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Jim »

This may be an ignorant question, but what is the advantage of a sewn-in lining over an independent lining, i.e., a slip?
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Coder »

Jim wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:46 am
This may be an ignorant question, but what is the advantage of a sewn-in lining over an independent lining, i.e., a slip?
Not ignorant! And one I debated. For this skirt it came down to keeping the slip in place and that just wasn’t happening. Linings are also thinner and less layers (sorta) so are easier to wear. I wouldn’t line every skirt - just ones that were impractical to wear with a slip.
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

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Jim wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:46 am
This may be an ignorant question, but what is the advantage of a sewn-in lining over an independent lining, i.e., a slip?
There is no such thing as an "ignorant" question (aka "stupid question").

If everything is functioning perfectly, there's little difference save for not having to worry about an extra piece. However, lined skirts do have the advantage that you can never select the wrong slip length for them and can be a "grab-and-go" garment. The lining also serves as friction control if you choose to wear a petticoat as well.

I have a bunch of lined skirts, but tend to wear them with slips anyway to minimise the amount of washing I have to do per week.

Disadvantages of a separate slip include waistbands that are close to shot and don't stay up properly (I had a slip go south in a parking-lot once, and boy did that surprise me!) or getting one too short (especially if one is wearing tights) or, worse, too long.

So, it's a trade-off, and much down to personal taste. In general, lined skirts tend to be of higher quality than unlined ones.
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denimini
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by denimini »

That is an interesting tutorial, because wearing a slip can be a problem with mini skirts, not that friction is such a problem with minis.
I have a few mini skirts that are lined, usually due to a coarse outer material. One pleated, woolen mini has a lime green lining that is also part of the style/design; the lace trim of the lining protrudes below the hem and, although something I would try an avoid with a slip, looks very cute, giving a lift to the brown hues of the skirt. Being a lining the amount of exposure is a controlled feature, but a slip ........ well I guess they don't call them slips for nothing.
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Jim
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Jim »

denimini wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:42 am
That is an interesting tutorial, because wearing a slip can be a problem with mini skirts, not that friction is such a problem with minis.
I have a few mini skirts that are lined, usually due to a coarse outer material. One pleated, woolen mini has a lime green lining that is also part of the style/design; the lace trim of the lining protrudes below the hem and, although something I would try an avoid with a slip, looks very cute, giving a lift to the brown hues of the skirt. Being a lining the amount of exposure is a controlled feature, but a slip ........ well I guess they don't call them slips for nothing.
Another slip question. It appears to me that many slips are designed for the bottom edge to be seen as they are quite decorative. So why is it somehow to be considered not quite right, even though seeing the slip is common?
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Coder »

Jim wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:08 pm
Another slip question. It appears to me that many slips are designed for the bottom edge to be seen as they are quite decorative. So why is it somehow to be considered not quite right, even though seeing the slip is common?
I’ve wondered that myself - I’ve always chalked it up to how women’s clothing tends to have little details - considered feminine in todays culture (lace) - even when not visible or easily visible (ie, sock cuffs). Or maybe if it does show by accident, it doesn’t look all utilitarian.

I’m a bit of a prude myself, so I find slip lace a bit too racy on women, and tacky on myself. But I wouldn’t think any less of a person that showed a bit lasey slip hemline, just makes me uncomfortable.
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Sinned
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Sinned »

I think that part of the reason for adding a trim to the hem of the slip is to provide a finished edge that looks decorative. The only alternatives being to turn up the hem and sew it ( not really viable due to the soft, silky or nylon material that slips are made from ) or to serge the hem which isn't aesthetically pleasing. So, although the hem isn't meant to be displayed it still has to look nice if it were to be accidentally displayed. Or that's how I see it anyway.
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Re: Adding a lining to a skirt

Post by Coder »

Sinned wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:45 pm
I think that part of the reason for adding a trim to the hem of the slip is to provide a finished edge that looks decorative. The only alternatives being to turn up the hem and sew it ( not really viable due to the soft, silky or nylon material that slips are made from ) or to serge the hem which isn't aesthetically pleasing. So, although the hem isn't meant to be displayed it still has to look nice if it were to be accidentally displayed. Or that's how I see it anyway.
Having just sewed lining material, this makes complete sense!
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