Other side of the coin

Clippings from news sources involving fashion freedom and other gender equality issues.

Re: Other side of the coin

Postby crfriend » Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:01 pm

mishawakaskirt wrote:Put up a sign at the entrance. That there is a keep your hands off policy. Touching not acceptable, you'll be asked to pay your bill and leave.

The problem in this case is that there's alcohol involved, and far too many folks (men and women alike) think that it's OK to do something when a bit tipsy that wouldn't be otherwise. Until that behavioural problem gets corrected societally this sort of unfortunate outcome will continue to occur.

Personally, I'd have left the decision to the individual staff-members. If somebody's getting too much grief there's an option. After all, everybody in the place is supposed to be an adult.
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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby JohnH » Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:46 pm

mishawakaskirt wrote:
Daryl wrote:
SkirtsDad wrote:The following article highlights a setback to the skirting/killted community: :(
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/kilt-wearing-barmen-forced-ditch-7908738


Man, that is so disappointing. Talk about the wrong way to handle the issue: punish the victims.

Sounds like an opportunity to open a competing business next door, too.
. Put up a sign at the entrance. That there is a keep your hands off policy. Touching not acceptable, you'll be asked to pay your bill and leave.


Women would not dare raise the skirt or kilt of a man in the US. If a person were dare do that, (s)he could be arrested and possibly be branded and charged as a sexual offender. Upon conviction such a person would have to register as a sexual offender for the rest of his/her life.

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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby crfriend » Thu Mar 08, 2018 11:16 pm

JohnH wrote:Women would not dare raise the skirt or kilt of a man in the US. If a person were dare do that, (s)he could be arrested and possibly be branded and charged as a sexual offender. Upon conviction such a person would have to register as a sexual offender for the rest of his/her life.

Women, in virtually all instances, are not prosecuted for this sort of behaviour in many, if not most, places in the USA. Nor, it seems, elsewhere. Double-standard.
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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby pelmut » Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:43 pm

Jim wrote:Many perfumes give me headaches. There are many of us with chemical sensitivities.

I am seriously allergic to perfume. Even when I don't initially smell it, I soon find I am loosing concentration, my eyes refuse to focus and my teeth feel as though they have gone soft because of the effect on my sensory nerves. The sooner it is banned outright in public places - like smoking - the better.

In case you think this is a bit harsh, compare it with food allergies. If I see that some food contains an allergen, I can chose not to eat it; if a perfume contains an allergen and someone decides to wear it in a public place, I cannot choose not to breathe and there is nothing I can do to stop them. This is exactly equivalent to allowing people to force-feed random members of the public with foods that contain allergens because they happen to like them themselves.
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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby moonshadow » Sat Mar 10, 2018 12:17 am

crfriend wrote:
JohnH wrote:Women would not dare raise the skirt or kilt of a man in the US. If a person were dare do that, (s)he could be arrested and possibly be branded and charged as a sexual offender. Upon conviction such a person would have to register as a sexual offender for the rest of his/her life.

Women, in virtually all instances, are not prosecuted for this sort of behaviour in many, if not most, places in the USA. Nor, it seems, elsewhere. Double-standard.


In all fairness, I don't see where there is enough data available to really see a pattern one way or the other. Simply put, most men don't wear skirts. The number of men who wear non kilted skirts is practically unmeasurable in any real terms, so we really don't know how women would react in general situations throughout the U.S. as men who wear non kilted skirts are VERY rare.

In my own sampling of hundreds of hours of public skirt wearing nobody has attempted to lift any of my skirts.

I'm not really a bar hopper... but is this really a thing?
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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby crfriend » Sat Mar 10, 2018 12:40 am

moonshadow wrote:
crfriend wrote:Women, in virtually all instances, are not prosecuted for this sort of behaviour in many, if not most, places in the USA. Nor, it seems, elsewhere. Double-standard.


In all fairness, I don't see where there is enough data available to really see a pattern one way or the other. Simply put, most men don't wear skirts. The number of men who wear non kilted skirts is practically unmeasurable in any real terms, so we really don't know how women would react in general situations throughout the U.S. as men who wear non kilted skirts are VERY rare.

That's fair enough, but recall how lightly the law treads on women generally. A judge, faced with such a situation would quite likely not know how to react and would quite probably come down on the guy for "asking for it". It's a vague area, and when laws are applied unequally in the first place anything becomes possible.
In my own sampling of hundreds of hours of public skirt wearing nobody has attempted to lift any of my skirts.

That's my direct experience as well, but I don't tend to hang out where things "get out of hand" and I'm large enough to usually avoid trouble because nobody gives it to me. Yes, I've had "The Question" a few times, but that's best dealt with with a cold stare, and, if asked why, an explanation of, "How would you feel if I asked you that?". However, that having been said, I can certainly envision a judge laughing me and my skirt out of court after assessing me the "count costs" for me bringing a charge.

No, I do not have any faith in the US "legal" system.
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Re: Other side of the coin

Postby moonshadow » Sat Mar 10, 2018 1:01 am

crfriend wrote:However, that having been said, I can certainly envision a judge laughing me and my skirt out of court after assessing me the "count costs" for me bringing a charge.


A hidden point is made here... as the judge would probably hold you in contempt of court for even showing up in a skirt! Double standards indeed...! Especially since the judge is probably wearing a long black dress....

Pro tip: I wouldn't point that out when he scorns you for your skirt wearing in his court room. :lol:

But seriously I do understand what you're saying. You're probably right, depending on the jurisdiction. Then it comes down to two factors:

1) How many women actually would lift the hem of a mans skirt without permission (if men in skirts were common)?

2) What would the legal ramifications be in such event?

I'd say the answer to that will probably sway on public opinion more than anything. In my experience men are more receptive to sexual advances than women. So if most men were cool with it, then I'd say you're right. However if most men felt the same way about it as women, then I'd say the court of public opinion would win out....

As in most cases with sexist double standards, men are often, collectively their own worst enemy. For every one "ball busting feminist" out there, there is about a thousand men that will also tell you to "man up and get over it"....
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