Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

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Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby crfriend » Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:06 pm

... know how to sew, amongst other things.

And so it came to pass this afternoon that I noticed that a collision with a server rack at work had, indeed, done damage when I thought there was none. I didn't notice a two-inch rip along a seam in my new black skirt with purple peacock feathers on it at the time and just did a few minutes ago.

I was not amused, and I'll be visiting that rack tomorrow and removing or otherwise safing what caught me.

However, that left the damaged skirt to deal with. Fortunately, my sewing kit managed to survive the Debacle of 2015 so at least I had tools. Knowing that I had the talent, I tacked the tear in the skirt with a paper-clip, got out my sewing kit and some black thread, and mended it. I am going to need to invest in some magnifying spectacles as threading the needle was a bear and I dropped it once and spent a while locating it on my couch.

Then I get to thinking about precisely how fortunate I am that I picked this skill up as a wee lad -- and it's not a common skill for guys to have, either. Most of my friends are incapable of even sewing a button back on; they'd have no idea how to start nor how to finish it off; so the job goes undone and they ditch the garment. That's neither my training nor my temperament. I fix things. That's what engineers do (although for me it's usually programs or computers).

I am a firm advocate that boys should be required to pass what used to be known as "home economics" which used to be formally taught to the girls in school (to fix the problem of mothers not teaching the basics) -- just as I am a firm advocate that the girls be required to pass "auto shop" (this'll keep them from playing the bimbo at the repair garage). Both are invaluable skill-sets in the modern world.

So, most of the time I'm fixing problems in the computer world, but I can sew to save myself the disappointment of tossing an otherwise very nice (and flashy) skirt. I can also cook, but don't enjoy it so usually eat out. It's called manhood, guys. We get to fix stuff because, likely, we're going to be "between mates" for substantial parts of our lives, and even when not so there's no guarantee that the partner is capable of "domestic bits".

Just don't ask me to "do Windows"; that'll draw a fast punch.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Grok » Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:38 pm

In the sewing section I described how I would sew a button back on. Also, I believe that there are online tutorials.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Darryl » Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:13 am

I just got Windows 10 and OS X to run on the same machine...and Server 2016...and OpenBSD...and Ubuntu. :D

And while I have a hand sewing kit, early last year I got a nice little machine...and the sales ladies liked my skirt. 8)
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Fred in Skirts » Wed Sep 27, 2017 4:32 am

I learned to sew at an early age, my mother taught me. Then in Jr High we (boys) had to take home economics and pass it. I have a sewing machine and know how to use it too. :lol:
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Stevie D » Wed Sep 27, 2017 8:10 am

crfriend wrote:... know how to sew, amongst other things.

...I am a firm advocate that boys should be required to pass what used to be known as "home economics" which used to be formally taught to the girls in school (to fix the problem of mothers not teaching the basics) -- just as I am a firm advocate that the girls be required to pass "auto shop" (this'll keep them from playing the bimbo at the repair garage). Both are invaluable skill-sets in the modern world.

At my secondary school (in the UK that's ages 11 - 18) all the boys did a term of cookery and needlework and all the girls did a term of woodwork and metalwork, with some engineering drawing too. This was in 1964. It was normal and accepted practice at the school. Quite a few girls went on to specialise in metalwork or woodwork and similarly, a few boys went on to take cookery. Both groups took the 'O'-level examinations in their chosen subjects at age 16. It was a good, forward-looking state-run school and I look back on the years I spent there with pleasure.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby crfriend » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:08 am

Stevie D wrote:At my secondary school (in the UK that's ages 11 - 18) all the boys did a term of cookery and needlework and all the girls did a term of woodwork and metalwork, with some engineering drawing too. This was in 1964. It was normal and accepted practice at the school.

Very impressive -- and forward-looking! None of that existed where I grew up in the US, hence my lament. It's good to hear that other places have their priorities straight.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby beachlion » Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:06 pm

Half of my live I was a bachelor if I subtract the first 15 years. And growing up in a ruined country afte WW2, I learned how to use what was avaible and repair all sorts of things. Repairing socks on a wooden ball, sewing on buttons, sewing ripped seams and so on. All those bachelor years I could take care of myself. The down side is that I have trouble to throw things in the trash because I see a possible replacement or repair when something breaks down. And becoming older there is another problem. When I need something, I know I have it but don't know where it is. But luckily you always find it after you bought the piece. :wink:

At elementary school, I was always rebellious. So I got a lot of punishment. Once a week there was handicraft for the boys and needlework for the girls. As a punishment, I had to go to the needlework classes with the girls. I did not mind at all and I learned a thing or two.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Sinned » Thu Sep 28, 2017 6:59 am

I taught myself to sew at an early age because my mother either was working or didn't enjoy sewing. My stitching may not be high quality as I don't get enough practice. I also earned my pocket money doing jobs around the house so learned housecraft. MOH does most of it now but I do my fair share and at least I know that I could do it again.
Last edited by Sinned on Sun Oct 01, 2017 8:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby Bowtie » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:52 pm

I taught myself to sew as well. I'm comfortable sewing buttons back on, repairing minor tears etc, but not big projects involving a sewing machine! I also studied 'food technology' as it was called at school (updated version of home economics I guess) and that was the most useful subject I took! Being able to cook is a very useful skill!!
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Re: Successful bachelors (or widowers) ...

Postby pelmut » Sun Oct 01, 2017 4:37 pm

My mother enjoyed sewing but would never have dreamed of teaching me to do it. However, she always worried that the sewing machine might break down in the middle of a project, so she made sure I was around whenever she was sewing. While I was there she would ask me to check that hems were straight or to pin them up for her - she also sometimes asked if I could make sense of confusing parts of the patterns. This meant that although I never actually did any sewing, I never felt it was something I didn't do.

When I moved into an unfurnished house, I could not afford to buy made-to-measure curtains, so I got hold of an old sewing machine and used it to put new linings into some old curtains that were being thrown out at work. A friend then bet me I couldn't make her a skirt for Christmas, so I took up the challenge - and also made one for myself to feel what it was like ...that's how I was hooked.
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