Common Terminology

General discussion of skirt and kilt-based fashion for men, and stuff that goes with skirts and kilts.

Common Terminology

Postby Uncle Al » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:06 am

After reading several "Opinions" about skirt length,
I've found the following pictorials describing skirt length
common to the fashion industry.

#1
Hem Lengths 2017-11-11.jpg


#2
Hem Lengths V2 2017-11-11.jpg


#3
Hem Lengths V3 2017-11-11.jpg


#4
Hem Lengths V4 2017-11-11.jpg


As you can see, most all agree with what length requires what name.
Another one I found called the next to the shortest name "Slut".

#5
Hem Lengths V5 2017-11-11.jpg


I would not necessarily use the last pic's definitions in mixed company,
or around children.

So, can we PLEASE use COMMON terminology when describing
the length of a skirt :?:

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Re: Common Terminology

Postby crfriend » Sun Nov 12, 2017 1:47 am

Uncle Al wrote:After reading several "Opinions" about skirt length, I've found the following pictorials describing skirt length common to the fashion industry.

I note that they've dumbed down the original notion of the "mini" where fingers below relaxed arms can touch the skin of the legs and have, instead, re-branded that as "micro". Does no-one here remember the 1960s?
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby beachlion » Sun Nov 12, 2017 2:54 am

I remember (and enjoyed) the 60s very well. But if I then had tried to touch the skin below the hem with a relaxed arm, I would have been in the same position as the Hollywood abusers of this day. :oops: :wink:
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby skirted_in_SF » Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:49 am

Uncle Al wrote:As you can see, most all agree with what length requires what name.
Another one I found called the next to the shortest name "Slut".

I think back in the day that length was called "Hello Officer" 8)
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby jv88101 » Wed Nov 29, 2017 3:29 pm

Thanks for sharing and posting this, very insightful.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby oldsalt1 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:33 pm

crfriend wrote:
Uncle Al wrote:After reading several "Opinions" about skirt length, I've found the following pictorials describing skirt length common to the fashion industry.

I note that they've dumbed down the original notion of the "mini" where fingers below relaxed arms can touch the skin of the legs and have, instead, re-branded that as "micro". Does no-one here remember the 1960s?

The micros really came in during the late 60's

I went into the service in Feb of 66 out Dec 68. during that time I was not really aware what was going on in fashions.

I remember driving around town a few days after I got home . I happened to pass the senior high school and was amazed at what amounted to extra large belts that the girls were wearing as skirts.

I just got the CD's for the original Laugh in show Its amazing what they were wearing.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby denimini » Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:02 pm

Interesting illustrations.
The term "short skirt" I assume is beween a mini and above knee. I also thought that a ballerina length was shorter than a micro - more like a tutu (perhaps a nano?).
Other than that it all makes sense.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Grok » Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:57 pm

In ballet there are a couple different skirts-the "ballerina" skirt, which is quite long, and the tutu.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Fred in Skirts » Thu Nov 30, 2017 6:56 pm

oldsalt1 wrote:I just got the CD's for the original Laugh in show Its amazing what they were wearing.

I have that set and I was amazed at what we wore then. Laugh-In was one of my favorite shows then. "Here comes the judge." :lol:
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby oldsalt1 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:47 pm

Fred in Skirts wrote:
oldsalt1 wrote:I just got the CD's for the original Laugh in show Its amazing what they were wearing.

I have that set and I was amazed at what we wore then. Laugh-In was one of my favorite shows then. "Here comes the judge." :lol:



its "sock it to me time"
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby r.m.anderson » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:24 pm

Yea the skirts of Judy Carne
The innocent looks of Goldie Hawn
The prim and proper Lily Tomlin

And yet it was on in early prime time with not much left to the imagination for language
or reading between the lines.

It was just like it was yesterday !
"Kilt-On" -or- as the case may be "Skirt-On" !
WHY ?
Isn't wearing a kilt enough?
Well a skirt will do in a pinch!
Make mine short and don't you dare think of pinching there !
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby oldsalt1 » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:59 pm

drawings are nice photos are better :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: sorry fellows nothing lomger
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby crfriend » Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:10 pm

oldsalt1 wrote:I just got the CD's for the original Laugh in show Its amazing what they were wearing.

The late 1960s through the 1970s were, I think, the last gasp of creative times when it came to clothing. That was effectively stamped out in the oh-so-corporate 1980s and was entirely dead in the yuppie-driven 90s.

I follow a few other fora, mostly to do with railway photography, and I'm always pleased to see shots from the '60s and '70s just to see the vast variety of styles that everyday people wore out and about in public. It's a lost era and a lost ethos sadly.

To be sure, that era laid more than its share of eggs fashion-wise, but that is an inevitable consequence of experimentation and pushing boundaries. In today's neo-con environment risk is to be shunned at all costs and absolute conformity is the result. We don't risk a botched experiment because experimentation is now entirely frowned upon. I view this as tragic.
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Re: Common Terminology

Postby Caultron » Fri Dec 01, 2017 3:18 am

crfriend wrote:The late 1960s through the 1970s were, I think, the last gasp of creative times when it came to clothing...To be sure, that era laid more than its share of eggs fashion-wise, but that is an inevitable consequence of experimentation and pushing boundaries. In today's neo-con environment risk is to be shunned at all costs and absolute conformity is the result. We don't risk a botched experiment because experimentation is now entirely frowned upon. I view this as tragic.

And yet here we are, with I dare say more media coverage for men in skirts than then.
Courage, conviction, nerve, verve, dash, panache, guts, nuts, balls, gall, élan, stones, whatever. Get some and get skirted.

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Re: Common Terminology

Postby crfriend » Fri Dec 01, 2017 10:18 am

Caultron wrote:And yet here we are, with I dare say more media coverage for men in skirts than then.

Indeed, but what is the purpose of the "coverage". Is it to educate and encourage, or is it a veiled attempt at public shaming? Which would sell more advertising copy?
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